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Overview

Brief Summary

Life on a wind-blown beach plain is not easy, but sea rocket is a hardy plant that is able to withstand such rough circumstances. It grows relatively far from the high tide line on top of buried flood marks or other organic material, just like sand couch. Without these nutrients, particualrly nitrogen, sea rocket cannot grow. Both sea rocket and sand couch are important plants for dune formation. Onces they take root, they catch sand which slowly turns into a dune.
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution in Egypt

Nile Valley North of Nubia (Delta), Mareotic Sector, North Sinai, Isthmic Desert, Galala Desert.

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Ceutorhynchus cakilis feeds on Cakile maritima

Foodplant / miner
larva of Psylliodes marcida mines stem of Cakile maritima
Other: sole host/prey

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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Annual.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cakile maritima

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cakile maritima

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 20
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Cakile maritima

Cakile maritima, the European searocket, is a common plant in the mustard family. It is widespread in Europe, especially on coastlines, and it can now be found in other areas of the world where it has been introduced. It is an inhabitant of the west and east coasts of North America, where it has the potential to become a noxious weed. This is an annual plant which grows in clumps or mounds in the sand on beaches and bluffs. The shiny leaves are fleshy, green and tinted with purple or magenta, and long-lobed. It has white to light purple flowers and sculpted, segmented, corky brown fruits one to three centimeters long. The fruits float and are water-dispersed.

Veterinary significance

The seed oil contains a high level of erucic acid, which can have pathological effects on the cardiac muscle of several animal species. However, Orange-bellied Parrots feed on its seed during their northward migrating journey from Tasmania.

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