Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

This is one of the woodland wildflowers that blooms during the summer in shaded areas. The flowers of such species are usually small, white, and not very showy. Enchanter's Nightshade is a rather odd member of the Evening Primrose family, as its flowers have only 2 petals, 2 sepals, and 2 stamens. This is a distinctive characteristic of the Circaea genus in this family. The only other member of this genus that occurs in Illinois, Circaea alpina (Small Enchanter's Nightshade), is an uncommon species that is restricted to the cool moist woodlands of northern Illinois. It has leaves that are more cordate and indented at the base, and its flowers are clustered toward the apex of the flowering stalk (rather than being evenly distributed along this stalk). While Enchanter's Nightshade is ¾-2' tall and it has 2-celled ovaries, Small Enchanter's Nightshade is less than 1' tall and it has 1-celled ovaries.
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Description

This perennial plant is about ¾-2' tall and unbranched or little branched. Scattered white hairs occur occasionally along the central stem, although it becomes glabrous with age. The opposite leaves are up to 5" long and 3" across (excluding the petioles); they are ovate-cordate, dentate along their margins, and largely hairless. The upper leaf surface is medium to dark green and hairless. The slender petioles of the leaves are up to 1½" long and medium green. The central stem terminates in a raceme of flowers up to 6" long. The stalk of this raceme has scattered white hairs. The small flowers are sparsely, but evenly, distributed along this stalk on slender pedicels up to ½" long. These pedicels spread outward. Each flower consists of 2 white petals, 2 green sepals, 2 stamens, and a slender style. Each petal is deeply divided into 2 lobes. At the base of each flower, there is a 2-celled ovary that is green and covered with stiff hooked hairs; it is obovoid in shape. Each cell of this ovary contains a single seed. The blooming period for a colony of plants occurs during the summer and lasts about a month. Each flower is short-lived and replaced by a small bur-like fruit (see the description of the ovary above). The root system can produce rhizomes or stolons that extend through the soil or leaf mould to create clonal offsets from the mother plant.
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Type Information

Isotype for Circaea canadensis var. virginiana Fernald
Catalog Number: US 1971568
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): M. L. Fernald
Year Collected: 1944
Locality: West Falls Church, Fairfax, Virginia, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Fernald, M. L. 1945. Rhodora. 47: 161.
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Ecology

Associations

Faunal Associations

The nectar and pollen of the flowers attract small bees, including Halictid bees (Lasioglossum spp.) and little carpenter bees (Ceratina spp.); they are also visited by Syrphid flies and bee flies (Bombyliidae). The caterpillars of a moth, Mompha terminella (Enchanter's Cosmet), are blotch leaf-miners. Birds and mammals help to distribute the seeds, as the small bur-like fruits can cling to feathers and fur; these fruits can cling to the clothing of humans as well. Deer occasionally browse on the foliage of Enchanter's Nightshade. Photographic Location
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Circaea canadensis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNA - Not Applicable

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is dappled sunlight to medium shade, more or less mesic conditions, and a rich loamy soil with abundant organic matter. Range & Habitat
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Boufford (2005) describes this hybrid between Circaea alpina and C. lutetiana sensu stricto.

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