Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Regional endemic of the southeastern Coastal Plain, from North Carolina south to central Florida and west to Mississippi (Kartesz, 1999; Godfrey, 1988). Reports from midwestern and south-central states outside this area are now considered Cornus drummondii, which in older literature has been called Cornus asperifolia.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Well-drained to briefly flooded woods, on calcareous or circumneutral (but not acidic) substrates such as limestone or marl (Godfrey, 1988; Radford et al., 1968).

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

Comments: Recorded from a scattering of counties in its range: About 2 in North Carolina (NCHP), 5 in South Carolina (Radford et al., 1968), 10 in Georgia (Jones and Coile, 1988), 10 in Alabama (Clark, 1971), 2 in Mississippi (Lowe, 1921), and 26 in northern and north-central Florida (Wunderlin et al., 2000). Total at least 50 counties, of which some would presumably have multiple occurrences (esp. in northern Florida) but perhaps some in which this species is no longer extant.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: PERENNIAL

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cornus asperifolia

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cornus asperifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Regional endemic of woods on relatively uncommon non-acidic substrates in the southeastern U.S. coastal plain, most common in northern Florida (where calcareous substates abundant) with a scattered distribution totaling about 50 counties counties.

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Threats

Comments: Invasive exotic understory shrubs (e.g., Ligustrum) noted as a threat in at least part of the range (J. Amoroso, pers. comm., Jan. 2000).

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: As treated here (following Kartesz, 1994 and 1999, and most other recent floristic authors), there are two species of roughleaf dogwood. Cornus asperifolia is a fairly rare species of the Southeastern U.S. Cornus drummondii is a widespread, abundant species primarily in the Midwest, central South, and Appalachians. The name "Cornus asperifolia" has also been applied (as by Small, 1933) to the Midwestern species at the exclusion of the southeastern one. If the midwestern plants are treated as a subspecies or variety of Cornus asperifolia, (e.g., as Cornus asperifolia var. drummondii), then it is correct to use the name "Cornus asperifolia" collectively for both kinds of roughleaf dogwood. All recent American floristic works consulted in a broad sampling (Jan. 2000) use the name Cornus asperifolia for the Southeastern plant, and Cornus drummondii for the Midwestern and South-Central plant. However, the use of "Cornus asperifolia" or "Cornus asperifolia var. drummondii" for the midwestern plant persists in some horticultural literature and nursery catalogs. Larry Morse, 29Jan00.

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