Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Cornus suecica L.:
Canada (North America)
Greenland (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cornus suecica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Chamaepericlymenum suecicum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cornus suecica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 5
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Cornus suecica

Cornus suecica (dwarf cornel or bunchberry) is a species of flowering plant in the genus Cornus (dogwoods), native to cool temperate and subarctic regions of Europe and Asia, and also locally in extreme northeastern and northwestern North America.

These plants are herbaceous perennials growing to 5–15 cm tall, with few pairs of cauline leaves in opposite pairs, 2–4 cm long and 1–3 cm broad. The flowers are small, dark purple, produced in a tight umbel that is surrounded by four conspicuous white petal-like bracts 1-1.5 cm long. The fruit is a red berry.

Habitat & Range: Wet woods & rocks; nearly circumboreal. In North America, the species is found in Alaska (U.S.) and British Columbia (Canada), and also eastern Canada (Labrador, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, and Quebec), as well as Greenland, but is absent in the intervening region.[2][1]

Where Cornus canadensis, a forest species, and Cornus suecica, a bog species, grow near each other in their overlapping ranges in Alaska, Labrador, and Greenland, they can hybridize by cross-pollination, producing plants with intermediate characteristics.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cornus suecica, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Profile, September 9, 2013 
  2. ^ "BONAP distribution maps for North American species of Cornus". Retrieved 17 May 2011. 
  3. ^ Neiland, Bonita J. 1971. The forest-bog complex of southeast Alaska. Vegetatio. 22: 1-64.


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