Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Mexico

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Western San Diego County, California and Baja California, Mexico.

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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Stipules with thick corky persistent bases; leaves all alternate, broadly obovate to almost round; the stomata in sunken pits; caps. 4-6 mm in diam.; fls. in lateral umbels; lvs. firm-coriaceous, persistent (Munz, 1959).

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Dry hills and mesas in chaparral.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: PERENNIAL, Long-lived, EVERGREEN

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Ceanothus verrocosus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ceanothus verrocosus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Mexico

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Ceanothus verrucosus has limited habitat and distribution in an area that is growing rapidly. In California is found in western San Diego county. In Baja California, Mexico, its abundance is not known.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: High - medium

Comments: This species is threatened by development (CNPS 2001, CNDDB 2003).

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Wikipedia

Ceanothus verrucosus

Ceanothus verrucosus is a species of shrub in the buckthorn family Rhamnaceae known by the common names wart-stem ceanothus, barranca brush, and white coast ceanothus. It is native to Baja California and San Diego County, where it grows in coastal chaparral and scrub. Most of the valuable coastal land that hosts this plant in the San Diego area has been claimed for development, but several populations still remain scattered around the region, such as one protected at Torrey Pines.[1]

Description[edit]

Ceanothus verrucosus is an erect shrub approaching 3 meters in maximum height. The bumpy evergreen leaves are alternately arranged, each up to about 1.5 centimeters long. The inflorescence is a cluster of flowers up to 2 centimeters long. The flower is white except for its characteristic dark center. The fruit is a capsule about half a centimeter long.

References[edit]

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