Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (1) (learn more)

Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

Both the foliage and berries are attractive, especially when growing along the walls of a building. However, because this woody vine is originally from East Asia, it shouldn't be introduced into natural areas where native species could be displaced. Boston Ivy is fairly easy to distinguish from Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia Creeper), because the mature leaves of the latter are palmately compound (usually with 5-9 leaflets) and the stalks of its mature berries are bright orange-red. The mature leaves of Boston Ivy are simple and the stalks of its berries are less colorful. Both of these species produce suckered tendrils. It is possible to confuse Boston Ivy with many Vitis spp. (Wild Grapes) because they are woody vines that produce simple leaves with 3-5 lobes. However, the tendrils of Wild Grapes don't produce disk-shaped suckers at their tips. Furthermore, the flowers of Wild Grape have a different appearance
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This introduced woody vine branches occasionally and can reach 50' in length. Boston Ivy can easily climb tree bark, wooden fences, concrete masonry, and brick or stone walls. In the absence of such supportive surfaces, it sprawls across the ground. The lower stems of mature vines are brown and woody; they can span several inches across and form small brown rootlets that can cling to various surfaces. The upper stems are hairless and vary in color from green to bright orange-red; they produce branched tendrils that have suckers at their tips. These suckers are shaped like small disks and can cling to various surfaces as well. Immature plants that are beginning to develop have trifoliate leaves. However, mature plants produce simple alternate leaves along their stems. The mature leaves span up to 6" long and across (excluding the petioles). They are cordate-oval, palmately lobed (usually with 3 lobes), and crenate or slightly undulate along the margins. Their upper surface is medium to dark green, hairless, and rather shiny. Young leaves of mature plants are similar, except they are yellowish green and coarsely dentate along the margins. The petioles of these leaves are long and slender; they are usually light green, but may become bright orange-red during the fall. Occasionally, cymes of flowers are produced from the axils of the leaves. Each cyme can span up to 4" across and long. Each yellowish green flower is about ¼" across, consisting of 5 green petals, 5 stamens with yellow anthers, and a central pistil. The sepals are absent or insignificant. The blooming period occurs during the summer and lasts about 2-3 weeks. The flowers are usually well-hidden in the foliage. Each fertilized flower can produce a juicy berry about 1/3" long that contains 1-3 seeds. The berries are dark blue with a whitish bloom and globoid in shape; their stalks are yellowish green, brownish green, or dull orange-red. The root system consists of a stout woody taproot.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 1.0 of 5

Distribution

Range and Habitat in Illinois

While commonly planted as an ornamental vine, Boston Ivy has rarely naturalized in the wild in Illinois. According to official records, it has naturalized in Hancock and Kane counties; the webmaster has observed escaped plants within the city of Urbana, Champaign County (see Distribution Map). Habitats include areas along railroads (including the gravel ballast) and areas along bridges. Boston Ivy is originally from East Asia. It is rather surprising that this introduced vine hasn't naturalized in more areas of the state, as it is a rampant grower and produces berries readily. However, some cultivars may be more productive of flowers and berries than others.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Parthenocissus tricuspidata (Siebold & Zucc.) Planch.:
Japan (Asia)
South Korea (Asia)
United States (North America)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Anhui, Fujian, Hebei, Henan, Jiangsu, Jilin, Liaoning, Shandong, Taiwan, Zhejiang [Japan, Korea].
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution: Japan, China, In Pakistan cultivated in Abbottabad.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Branchlets terete, nearly glabrous or sparsely pilose; tendrils 5-9-branched, young apex expanded and ball-shaped. Leaves simple, usually 3-lobed on short branches, or small and unlobed on long branches; petiole 4-12 cm, glabrous or sparsely pubescent; blade obovoid, 4.5-17 × 4-16 cm, abaxially glabrous or midvein abaxially sparsely pubescent, basal veins 5, lateral veins 3-5 pairs on each side, veinlets slightly raised abaxially, inconspicuous adaxially, base cordate, margin with rough teeth on each side, apex acute. Polychasium 2.5-12.5 cm; rachis inconspicuous; peduncles 1-3.5 cm, nearly glabrous. Pedicel 2-3 mm, glabrous. Buds obovoid-elliptic, 2-3 mm, apex rounded. Calyx entire or undulate. Petals elliptic, 1.8-2.7 mm, glabrous. Filaments 1.5-2.4 mm; anthers ovoid-elliptic, 0.7-1.4 mm. Disk inconspicuous. Ovary oval; style conspicuous, base thick; stigma not enlarged. Berry 1-1.5 cm in diam., 1-3-seeded. Seeds obovoid, base with a sharp, short rostrum, apex rounded. Fl. May-Aug, fr. Sep-Oct. 2n = 40.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 4.0 of 5

Description

A large climbing shrub up to 20 m tall strongly branched; tendrils much branched, broadening at apex into adhesive disc. Leaves simple, 5-6 cm long, undivided or 3-lobed, orbicular, ovate or suborbicular and deltoid, crenate-serrate, acuminate - cuspidate, or mucronate, cordate at base, turns red in autumn. Inflorescence much shorter than petiole, disc adnate to the base of ovary, 5-lobed, margin slightly swollen, berry bluish black, 1-2 seeded. Seeds pruinose, 6-8 mm long.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 4.0 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Ampelopsis tricuspidata Siebold & Zuccarini, Abh. Math.-Phys. Cl. Königl. Bayer. Akad. Wiss. 4(2): 196. 1845; Cissus thunbergii Siebold & Zuccarini; Parthenocissus thunbergii (Siebold & Zuccarini) Nakai; Psedera thunbergii (Siebold & Zuccarini) Nakai; P. tricuspidata (Siebold & Zuccarini) Rehder; Quinaria tricuspidata (Siebold & Zuccarini) Koehne; Vitis inconstans Miquel; V. taquetii H. Léveillé; V. thunbergii (Siebold & Zuccarini) Druce (1917), not Siebold & Zuccarini (1845).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

While commonly planted as an ornamental vine, Boston Ivy has rarely naturalized in the wild in Illinois. According to official records, it has naturalized in Hancock and Kane counties; the webmaster has observed escaped plants within the city of Urbana, Champaign County (see Distribution Map). Habitats include areas along railroads (including the gravel ballast) and areas along bridges. Boston Ivy is originally from East Asia. It is rather surprising that this introduced vine hasn't naturalized in more areas of the state, as it is a rampant grower and produces berries readily. However, some cultivars may be more productive of flowers and berries than others.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Shrublands, cliffs, rocky hillsides; 100-1200 m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Faunal Associations

Information about floral-faunal relations are unavailable for North America. However, it is likely that they are similar to the floral-faunal relations of Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia Creeper), as described in the Savanna-Thicket section of this website. In particular, the berries of Boston Ivy are occasionally eaten by songbirds, which can disperse the seeds to new locations.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / saprobe
scattered, nestling in cortex and long hidden by it stroma of Cytospora coelomycetous anamorph of Cytospora ampelopsidis is saprobic on bark (twig) of Parthenocissus tricuspidata

Foodplant / parasite
Erysiphe necator parasitises Parthenocissus tricuspidata

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per.: June - July.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Parthenocissus tricuspidata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 14
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
  • Aeschimann, D. & C. Heitz. 2005. Synonymie-Index der Schweizer Flora und der angrenzenden Gebiete (SISF). 2te Auflage. Documenta Floristicae Helvetiae N° 2. Genève.   http://www.crsf.ch/ External link.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Info Flora (CRSF/ZDSF) & Autoren 2005

Supplier: Name It's Source (profile not public)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

Boston Ivy prefers full sun to light shade, slightly moist to slightly dry conditions, and a fertile loamy soil to support its rampant growth. It will tolerate soil containing clay or stony material. Flowers and berries are more likely to be produced if there is some exposure to sunlight.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Parthenocissus tricuspidata

Parthenocissus tricuspidata is a flowering plant in the grape family (Vitaceae) native to eastern Asia in Japan, Korea, and northern and eastern China. Though unrelated to true ivy, it is commonly known as Japanese creeper, Boston ivy, Grape ivy, Japanese ivy, and woodbine (though the latter may refer to a number of vines).

It is a deciduous woody vine growing to 30 m tall or more given suitable support, attaching itself by means of numerous small branched tendrils tipped with sticky disks. The leaves are simple, palmately lobed with three lobes, occasionally unlobed or with five lobes, or sufficiently deeply lobed to be palmately compound with (usually) three leaflets; the leaves range from 5–22 cm across. The flowers are inconspicuous, greenish, in clusters; the fruit is a small dark blue grape 5–10 mm diameter.

The specific epithet tricuspidata means three-pointed, referring to the leaf shape.[1]

Cultivation and uses[edit]

Like the related Virginia creeper, it is widely grown as a climbing ornamental plant to cover the façades of masonry buildings. Its use for this in Boston, Massachusetts, United States has resulted in one of the alternative names. This usage is actually economically important because, by shading walls during the summer, it can significantly reduce cooling costs.

It is readily distinguished from Virginia creeper by the simple leaves (always palmately compound with 5 leaflets in Virginia creeper).

The plant secretes calcium carbonate,[2] which serves as an adhesive pad and gives it the ability to attach itself to a wall without requiring any additional support. While it does not penetrate the building surface but merely attaches to it, nevertheless damage can occur from attempting to rip the plant from the wall. However, if the plant is killed first, such as by severing the vine from the root, the adhesive pads will eventually deteriorate to the point where the plant can be easily removed without causing any damage to the wall.

Perhaps one of its most famous uses in the United States is the ivy covered brick outfield walls at Wrigley Field.

Cultivars include 'Veitchii'. [3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. p. 224. ISBN 9781845337315. 
  2. ^ Jason Canon. "'The Ivy League'". 
  3. ^ BBC Plant finder: Boston Ivy

See also[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

This species is widely cultivated as an attractive ornamental climber in China and in many other countries. Its roots have been used to cure lumps and ecchymosis.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 1.0 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!