Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Regional endemic: Coastal plain (and somewhat into adjacent provinces) of sw Georgia (6 cos.) and in the Cumberland Plateau of Alabama (7 cos.). Also disjunctly near the Fall Line in South Carolina. Falsely reported from Florida (Kartesz 1999).

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Rich mesic forests on bluffs and silty alluvial woods, usually on circumneutral soils (limestone, shale, alluvium).

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Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
epiphyllous, scattered or crowded pycnidium of Phyllosticta coelomycetous anamorph of Guignardia aesculi causes spots on live leaf of Aesculus parviflora
Remarks: season: 7-

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

Comments: ?

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Aesculus parviflora

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aesculus parviflora

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Locally common in Alabama and southwestern Georgia and, disjunctly, South Carolina. Abundance range-wide not known, but there are probably fewer than 100 occurrences.

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Wikipedia

Aesculus parviflora

Aesculus parviflora (bottlebrush buckeye); syn. Aesculus macrostachya Michx., Pavia macrostachya (Michx.) Loisel. is a species of Aesculus native to open woodlands of the southeastern United States. It is also called "dwarf horse chestnut" in recognition of its resemblance to its more famous relative A. hippocastanum.

It is a deciduous suckering shrub growing to 3-5 m tall. The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs, palmately compound with 5-7 leaflets, each leaflet short-stalked, 12-22 cm long and 5-10 cm broad, with an entire margin. The flowers are produced in conspicuous erect panicles 20-30 cm long resembling a traditional bottle brush, each flower with a tubular calyx, small white petals, and several protruding 3-4 cm long stamens.

The Latin specific epithet parviflora means "small-flowered".[1]

Cultivation and uses[edit]

It is grown as an ornamental plant in gardens, where its August flowering attracts butterflies. The naturalist, explorer and plant collector William Bartram first noted this undescribed shrub on his travels through Carolina, Georgia and Florida in 1773-78.[2] Though an old example was still to be found in Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia, in 1930,[3] the shrub has never become common in Eastern American gardens.

Aesculus parviflora was introduced to British horticulture through the activities of John Fraser, who made his first botanizing trip through the American South in 1785. Fraser's finds were distributed among English nurserymen like Lee and Kennedy or Loddiges or to private patrons, and the shrub was "to be met with in most of our nurseries" by 1820.[4] This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. p. 224. ISBN 9781845337315. 
  2. ^ Noted by Alice M. Coats, Garden Shrubs and Their Histories (1964) 1992, s.v. "Aesculus"; Bartram's botanizing explorations were recorded in his Travels through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, the Cherokee Country, etc., 1791.
  3. ^ Coats 1992.
  4. ^ Quoted in Coats 1992.
  5. ^ "Aesculus parviflora". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 25 July 2013. 


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