Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Seacoast.

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Distribution: Similar to the genus.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs or small trees, 1-3 m tall. Branches pubescent, with partially capitate glandular setae when young; branchlets dense, often with scar. Leaves with very short petiole, often fascicled at ends of branchlets; leaf blade somewhat fleshy, narrowly oblanceolate, 25-35 × ca. 5 mm, base gradually narrow, margin entire, apex obtuse; veins inconspicuous. Cymes axillary, 2-4-flowered; bracts lanceolate, 4-9 × 1-1.5 mm, pubescent; pedicel ca. 1 cm, pubescent. Sepals ovate-lanceolate or ovate-oblong, 5-10 × 2-4 mm, pubescent. Petals yellow, imbricate, obovate, oblong, or rounded, with short claw, deciduous. Filaments basally villous, ca. 5 mm. Carpels hairy, obovoid to globose; styles glabrous, ca. 5 mm; stigma small but conspicuous. Drupe pubescent, subglobose, ca. 3.5 mm, with persistent basifixed style. Fl. Jun-Jul, fr. Aug-Oct.
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Description

Leaves linear-spathulate, 1.5-2.5 cm x 2-6 mm, densely pubescent, sessile or shortly petioled, midrib prominent, lateral nerves obscure. Flowers yellow. Sepals c. 8 x 3 mm, pubescent, connate at base. Petals imbricate, obovate, c. 5 x 2-3 mm. Ovary pilose. Styles filiform. Fruit velvety, globose, pointed at the base, c. 3 mm in diameter.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Grows along tropical seacoast.

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Depth range based on 4 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 1
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Habitat & Distribution

Sandy places, gaps among stones on beaches. Guangdong (Xisha Qundao), Taiwan [tropical coasts throughout the world].
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Suriana maritima

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Suriana maritima

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Grows throughout the tropics of both hemispheres occurring along the seacoast.

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Wikipedia

Suriana

Suriana is a monotypic genus of flowering plants containing only Suriana maritima,[3] which is commonly known as Bay Cedar. It has a pantropical distribution and can be found on coasts in the New and Old World tropics. Bay Cedar is an evergreen shrub or small tree, usually reaching a height of 1–2 m (3.3–6.6 ft) and sometimes reaching 6 m (20 ft).[4] The leaves are alternate, simple, 1–6 cm (0.39–2.4 in) long and 0.6 cm (0.24 in) wide.[5] The grey-green, succulent foliage yields an aroma similar to that of cedar when crushed, hence the common name.[4] Its yellow flowers are solitary or in short[5] cymes among the leaves.[4] Flowers have a diameter of 1.5 cm (0.59 in) when open, with petals 6–10 mm (0.24–0.39 in) long and sepals 7–10 mm (0.28–0.39 in) long. Bay Cedar flowers throughout the year.[5] After fertilisation, the flowers form clusters of five dry, hard drupes 3–4 mm (0.12–0.16 in) in diameter. The drupes are buoyant and can maintain the viability of the seeds during long periods in seawater, allowing the seeds to be dispersed via the ocean.[4]

References

  1. ^ "Suriana L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 1996-09-17. http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/genus.pl?11731. Retrieved 2009-12-06.
  2. ^ "Suriana maritima L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Gardens. http://www.tropicos.org/Name/29400077. Retrieved 2009-12-06.
  3. ^ "Subordinate Taxa of Suriana L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Gardens. http://www.tropicos.org/NameSubordinateTaxa.aspx?nameid=40008037. Retrieved 2009-12-06.
  4. ^ a b c d "Suriana maritima L. bay-cedar". International Institute of Tropical Forestry. United States Forest Service. http://www.fs.fed.us/global/iitf/pdf/shrubs/Suriana%20maritima.pdf. Retrieved 2009-12-06.
  5. ^ a b c Nelson, Gil (1996). The Shrubs and Woody Vines of Florida: a Reference and Field Guide. Pineapple Press, Inc. p. 345. ISBN 978-1-56164-110-9. http://books.google.com/books?id=vNMnsHiDkOkC&dq.
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Notes

Comments

Murray had collected it from coast of Sind and Cutch (R.R. Stewart, l.c.) but no material of our region is present either in our herbaria or in Kew and British Museum; the record therefore seems dubious.

Though Linnaeus cites his generic name from Hortus Cliffortianus but Dr. N.K.B. Robson has kindly intimated that now there is no specimen in the Clifford Herbarium. As all the three specimens in LINN. were acquired after 1753 hence these are not elligible to be treated as Types. This leaves three literature references as Syntypes. Plumier, from which Linnaeus-took the generic name, has not given any illustration. Pluknet (alm.: t. 241. f. 5. 1696) gives a rather stylised illustration of sterile material. Hence the illustration given by Sloane (loc. cit.) is chosen here as the Lectotype.

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