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Overview

Brief Summary

How does a plant cross a body of water to colonize an island? If the fruit, containing the seeds, is able to float then it is a matter of falling into the water and catching the right currents. This is most likely the way seakale arrived on Texel in the previous century. The plant grows in salty environments on rocky or sandy bottoms. The round, nut-like seed pods contain 1 seed each and can survive a long journey at sea. Darwin discovered seakale seeds that had floated 37 days in seawater and still germinated! You know when seakale flowers from its strong fragrance.
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Ceutorhynchus cakilis feeds on Crambe maritima

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
Erysiphe cruciferarum parasitises live Crambe maritima

Animal / pathogen
Rhizoctonia anamorph of Helicobasidium purpureum infects root of Crambe maritima
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / parasite
colony of sporangium of Peronospora parasitica parasitises live Crambe maritima
Remarks: season: 1-4

Foodplant / pathogen
Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris infects and damages live, yellow-blotched leaf of Crambe maritima

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Crambe maritima

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Crambe maritima

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 10
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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Wikipedia

Crambe maritima

Crambe maritima flowers; Saaremaa, Estonia
Shingle beach with sea kale, Landguard Fort

Crambe maritima (common name sea kale, seakale or crambe[1]) is a species of halophytic flowering plant in the genus Crambe of the family Brassicaceae, that grows wild along the coasts of Europe, from the North Atlantic to the Black Sea. Growing to 75 cm (30 in) tall by 60 cm (24 in) wide, it is a mound-forming, spreading perennial.[2] It has large fleshy glaucous collard-like leaves and abundant white flowers. The seeds come one each in globular pods.

The plant is cultivated both as an ornamental plant and as a vegetable, related to the cabbage. Along the coast of England, where it is commonly found above high tide mark on shingle beaches, local people heaped loose shingle around the naturally occurring root crowns in springtime, thus blanching the emerging shoots. By the early 18th century it had become established as a garden vegetable, but its height of popularity was the early 19th century when sea kale appeared in Thomas Jefferson's Garden Book of 1809, and it was served at the Prince Regent's Royal Pavilion in Brighton. The shoots are served like asparagus: steamed, with either a béchamel sauce or melted butter, salt and pepper. It is apt to get bruised or damaged in transport and should be eaten very soon after cutting, this may explain its subsequent decline in popularity. However, given a rich, deep and sandy soil, it is easy to propagate and grow on from root cuttings available from specialist nurseries. Blanching may be achieved by covering it with opaque material or using a deep, loose and dry mulch.[3]

Blanched Crambe Maritima

As an ornamental garden plant, C. maritima has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "Sea-kale". New International Encyclopedia. 1905. 
  2. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  3. ^ "Crambe maritima". Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Crambe maritima". Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
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