Overview

Distribution

Global Range: UT (Garfield, Grand, Kane, San Juan, and Wayne counties), OK (6 counties), KS (15 counties), NE (20 counties), WY (7 counties), NM (3 counties), MT (6 counties, SD (12 counties) south to AZ, CO (19 counties), TX (Trans Pecos, s. plains, Panhandle, 11 counties), and Chihuahua.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Blackbrush, spiny hopsage, shadscale, galleta-ricegrass, and pinyon-juniper communities at 1250-1830 m. Sandy prairies, stream valleys, roadsides, waste places.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Oenothera albicaulis

Oenothera albicaulis is a New World plant in the evening primrose family. It is known by the common names prairie evening-primrose,[2] white-stem evening-primrose,[1] or whitish evening primrose.[3]

Contents

Distribution[edit]

Oenothera albicaulis is native to North America, in the U.S. (Arizona; Colorado; Montana; New Mexico; Oklahoma; South Dakota; Texas; and Utah), and in Mexico (in Chihuahua state).[1]

Uses[edit]

The Zuni people rub the chewed blossoms on the bodies of young girls so that they can dance well and ensure rain.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Oenothera albicaulis was originally described and published in Flora Americae Septentrionalis 2: 733. 1814 [1813] GRIN (December 13, 2012). "Oenothera albicaulis information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved April 7, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Name - !Oenothera albicaulis Pursh". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved April 7, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Stevenson, Matilda Coxe (1915). "Ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians". SI-BAE Annual Report (30): 87. 
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