Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Stellaria holostea L.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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introduced; Conn., Mass., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa.; Eurasia.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants perennial, scrambling to ascending, from slender, creeping rhizomes. Stems branched dis­-tally, 4-angled, 15-60 cm, glabrous or hispid-puberulent distally. Leaves sessile; blade narrowly lanceolate, widest near base, 4-8 cm × 2-10 mm, somewhat coriaceous, base round and clasping, margins and abaxial midrib very rough, apex narrowly and sharply acuminate, scabrid, otherwise glabrous, slightly glaucous. Inflorescences terminal, loose, 3-31-flowered cymes; bracts foliaceous, 5-50 mm, margins and abaxial midrib scabrid. Pedicels ascending, 1-60 mm, slender, pubescent. Flowers 20-30 mm diam.; sepals 5, inconspicuously 3-veined, ovate-lanceolate, 6-8 mm, margins narrow, scarious, apex acute, glabrous; petals 5 (rarely absent), 8-14 mm, longer than sepals, blade apex 2-fid to middle; stamens 10, sometimes fewer by degeneration; styles 3, ascending, ca. 4 mm. Capsules green, subglobose, 5-6 mm, ± equaling sepals, apex obtuse, opening by 3 valves, tardily splitting into 6; carpophore absent. Seeds reddish brown, reniform, 2-3 mm diam., papillose. 2n = 26 (Europe).
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Alsine holostea (Linnaeus) Britton
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Ecology

Habitat

Woodlands, hedgerows; 0-500m.
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Associations

Foodplant / parasite
pseudothecium of Didymella holosteae parasitises dying leaf of Stellaria holostea
Remarks: season: 2

Foodplant / parasite
mostly hypophyllous telium of Melampsorella caryophyllacearum parasitises live leaf of Stellaria holostea
Other: minor host/prey

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / pathogen
embedded sorus of Microbotryum stellariae infects and damages live anther of Stellaria holostea

Foodplant / pathogen
amphigenous colony of Mycocentrospora anamorph of Mycocentrospora acerina infects and damages live leaf of Stellaria holostea

Foodplant / saprobe
hypophyllous, immersed pseudothecium of Mycosphaerella isariophora is saprobic on dead leaf of Stellaria holostea
Remarks: season: 4-5

Foodplant / parasite
hypophyllous telium of Puccinia arenariae parasitises live leaf of Stellaria holostea

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering spring.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Stellaria holostea

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Stellaria holostea

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Stellaria holostea

Stellaria holostea (addersmeat, or greater stitchwort) is an ornamental plant native of Europe.

It can grow up to 50 cm in height, with leaves that are long, narrow and fresh green.[1] The flowers are white, 20-30mm across and have five distinctive petals split to about halfway down.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sterry, Paul (1997). Complete British Wildlife. London: HarperCollins. p. 240. ISBN 978-0-583-33638-3. 
  2. ^ Waller, Chris (1981). Nature Guide to the Lake District. London: Usborne Publishing. p. 72. ISBN 0-86020-403-0. 
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Notes

Comments

Stellaria holostea is sometimes cultivated and occasionally naturalizes.
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