Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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introduced; Conn., Mass., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa.; Eurasia.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants perennial, scrambling to ascending, from slender, creeping rhizomes. Stems branched dis­-tally, 4-angled, 15-60 cm, glabrous or hispid-puberulent distally. Leaves sessile; blade narrowly lanceolate, widest near base, 4-8 cm × 2-10 mm, somewhat coriaceous, base round and clasping, margins and abaxial midrib very rough, apex narrowly and sharply acuminate, scabrid, otherwise glabrous, slightly glaucous. Inflorescences terminal, loose, 3-31-flowered cymes; bracts foliaceous, 5-50 mm, margins and abaxial midrib scabrid. Pedicels ascending, 1-60 mm, slender, pubescent. Flowers 20-30 mm diam.; sepals 5, inconspicuously 3-veined, ovate-lanceolate, 6-8 mm, margins narrow, scarious, apex acute, glabrous; petals 5 (rarely absent), 8-14 mm, longer than sepals, blade apex 2-fid to middle; stamens 10, sometimes fewer by degeneration; styles 3, ascending, ca. 4 mm. Capsules green, subglobose, 5-6 mm, ± equaling sepals, apex obtuse, opening by 3 valves, tardily splitting into 6; carpophore absent. Seeds reddish brown, reniform, 2-3 mm diam., papillose. 2n = 26 (Europe).
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Alsine holostea (Linnaeus) Britton
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Ecology

Habitat

Woodlands, hedgerows; 0-500m.
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Associations

Foodplant / parasite
pseudothecium of Didymella holosteae parasitises dying leaf of Stellaria holostea
Remarks: season: 2

Foodplant / parasite
mostly hypophyllous telium of Melampsorella caryophyllacearum parasitises live leaf of Stellaria holostea
Other: minor host/prey

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / pathogen
embedded sorus of Microbotryum stellariae infects and damages live anther of Stellaria holostea

Foodplant / pathogen
amphigenous colony of Mycocentrospora anamorph of Mycocentrospora acerina infects and damages live leaf of Stellaria holostea

Foodplant / saprobe
hypophyllous, immersed pseudothecium of Mycosphaerella isariophora is saprobic on dead leaf of Stellaria holostea
Remarks: season: 4-5

Foodplant / parasite
hypophyllous telium of Puccinia arenariae parasitises live leaf of Stellaria holostea

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering spring.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Stellaria holostea

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Stellaria holostea

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Stellaria holostea

Stellaria holostea (greater stitchwort or addersmeat) is a perennial herbaceous flowering plant in the carnation family Caryoophyllaceae.

Description[edit]

It can grow up to 60 cm in height, with leaves that are long, narrow (lanceolate) and fresh green.[1] The flowers are white, 20-30mm across and have five distinctive petals split to about halfway down.[1][2]

Distribution[edit]

Stellaria holostea is native to Western and Central Europe, including the British Isles.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sterry, Paul (1997). Complete British Wildlife. London: HarperCollins. p. 240. ISBN 978-0-583-33638-3. 
  2. ^ Waller, Chris (1981). Nature Guide to the Lake District. London: Usborne Publishing. p. 72. ISBN 0-86020-403-0. 

External links[edit]


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Notes

Comments

Stellaria holostea is sometimes cultivated and occasionally naturalizes.
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