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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution: Temperate and warm regions throughout the world.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annual herb up to 60 cm tall. Stem erect, branched, glabrous. Leaves alternate, 1.5-2.5 cm long, broadly lanceolate, 3-nerved, entire, sessile. Flowers red, regular, dimorphic in cymose clusters; pedicel 4-5 mm long, elongating in fruit. Sepals free, c. 7 mm long, enlarging in fruit, ovate, acuminate, serrate, peristent. Petals free, obovate, up to 2 cm long. Stamens 5, connate at the base, filaments 6-8 mm long, dilated at the base; anthers c. 3 mm long. Ovary ovoid, c. 2 mm long, styles 5, filiform, connate at the base; stigma linear, 2 mm long. Capsule sub-globose, 7-8 mm long; seeds 4 mm long, brown, compressed.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per. March-April.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Linum grandiflorum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Linum grandiflorum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Linum grandiflorum

Linum grandiflorum (syn. L. coccineum) is a species of flax known by several common names, including red flax, scarlet flax, and crimson flax. It is native to Algeria, but it is known elsewhere in Northern Africa, Southern Europe and in several locations in North America as an introduced species.[1] It is an annual herb producing an erect, branching stem lined with waxy, lance-shaped leaves 1 to 2 centimeters long. The inflorescence bears flowers on pedicels several centimeters long. The flower has 5 red petals each up to 3 centimeters long and stamens tipped with anthers bearing light blue pollen. It can on occasion be found as a casual well outside its normal established range; records from the British Isles, for example, are reasonably frequent (as per the latest BSBI atlas) but, grown as an annual, it rarely persists for more than one season.

Contents

Cultivation

A popular garden plant, L. grandiflorum has been cultivated in a number of colours such as salmon. Some varieties are known as L. grandiflorum rubrum, L. grandiflorum var. rubrum or L. grandiflorum 'Rubrum'. Other varieties include Bright Eyes.

References

Sources

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Notes

Comments

“Flowering Flax” is cultivated in gardens for its beautiful scarlet or red flowers.
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