Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ceanothus purpureus Jeps.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Global Range: Endemic to Napa County, California (Callizo and Fremont 1988).

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Almost entirely restricted to ridgetops and west-facing slopes, seldom occurring lower than halfway down the hillsides; elevation 120-630 m. Grows in the chaparral community in dry, rocky, brushy places, usually in full sun. Substrate is invariably Sonoma volcanic. Does not frequently appear on disturbed sites (Callizo and Fremont 1988).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Ceanothus purpureus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ceanothus purpureus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: This species is endemic to California, occurring in Napa, Sonoma and Solano counties. It is threatened by vineyard and residential development, and alteration of fire regimes.

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Threats

Comments: The California Native Plant society reports that this species is threatened by agriculture, namely vineyard development, residential development and alteration of fire regimes (2001).

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Wikipedia

Ceanothus purpureus

Ceanothus purpureus, with the common name Hollyleaf ceanothus, is a species of shrub in the buckthorn family Rhamnaceae. It is endemic to northern California, where it is known only from the Inner North Coast Ranges north of the Bay Area, mainly in Sonoma and Napa Counties. The largest remaining population of this shrub occurs on Mt. George near Napa, where it is protected in a botanical preserve.[1]

Contents

Description

The Ceanothus purpureus plant grows in woodland and chaparral habitat. It is spreading or erect in form, approaching 2 meters in maximum height. The woody parts are gray to reddish brown in color. The evergreen leaves are oppositely arranged and up to about 2.5 centimeters long. They are round to oval, wavy, and edged with spiny teeth, resembling the leaf of holly. The inflorescence is a small cluster of blue or purple flowers. The fruit is a horned capsule about half a centimeter long.

See also

References

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