Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

This native member of the Carrot family should be grown more often in wildflower gardens. Sometimes it is called 'Hairy Meadow Parnsip,' but conspicuous hairs occur only at the base of the petioles of compound leaves, and these are not easy to see unless you know where to look. This plant resembles the weedy and aggressive Pastinaca sativa (Wild Parsnip), but the latter has flat compound umbels of yellow flowers, while Hairy-Jointed Meadow Parsnip has compound umbels of pale yellow flowers that are more rounded. There are also significant differences in the structure of the compound leaves between these two species. Return
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Description

This is a native perennial plant that branches sparingly, and is up to 3½' tall. The alternate leaves are bipinnately or ternately compound, and tend to be aggregated toward the base of the plant. The basal leaves are up to 12" long and 6" across, while smaller leaves are sparsely distributed along the middle and upper portions of the stems. Sometimes there are minute stiff hairs at the base of the petioles where the compound leaves meet the stem. The leaflets have large blunt teeth, and often occur in pairs or triplets, with the terminal leaflets achieving the largest size. Each leaflet is up to 1" long and ½" across, lanceolate or ovate, and has wedge-shaped lower margins. The overall appearance of the leaves resembles Italian Parsley. 
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Ecology

Associations

Faunal Associations

Many kinds of insects are attracted to the flowers, especially short-tongued bees, wasps, flies, and beetles. The caterpillars of the butterfly Papilio polyxenes asterias (Black Swallowtail) feed on the foliage and flowers. This plant is not known to be toxic, and is probably consumed occasionally by various mammalian herbivores, although information about this is limited. Photographic Location
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Flower-Visiting Insects of Hairy-Jointed Meadow Parsnip in Illinois

Thaspium barbinode (Hairy-Jointed Meadow Parsnip)
(bees suck nectar or collect pollen, while flies and beetles suck nectar or feed on pollen; observations are from Krombein et al. and Lindsey)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera (Lnd); Apidae (Bombini): Bombus affinis (Lnd)

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Augochlorella striata fq (Lnd); Colletidae (Hylaeninae): Hylaeus modestus modestus fq (Lnd); Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena crataegi fq (Lnd), Andrena miranda fq (Lnd), Andrena nasonii (Lnd), Andrena personata (Kr), Andrena ziziae cp fq olg (Kr, Lnd)

Flies
Empididae: Rhamphomyia sp. fq (Lnd)

Beetles
Scraptiidae: Anaspis sp. fq (Lnd); Staphylinidae: Eusphalerum sp. fq (Lnd)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full or partial sun and mesic conditions. The soil can contain significant amounts of loam, sand, or rocky material. Light shade is tolerated, but growth will be less robust and flowering less abundant. Hairy-Jointed Meadow Parsnip develops rapidly during the spring, and is usually taller than the surrounding plants when the blooming period begins. After flowering, the condition of the plant rapidly deteriorates. Range & Habitat
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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