Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (4) (learn more)

Overview

Brief Summary

Capsicum annuum, bell, sweet, or chili pepper—with cultivated varieties including bell, sweet, chili, and paprika peppers—is a perennial herbaceous plants in the Solanaceae (nightshade family), which originated in Central and South America and the Caribbean and was domesticated over 5,000 years ago. Peppers from C. annuum have been developed into numerous varieties that are now cultivated around the world for sweet and hot varieties of green and red bell peppers and chili peppers, that are one of the world’s most widely used spices, with dried forms including paprika, chili powder, and cayenne.

Capsicum annuum, which is perennial but often cultivated as an annual in temperate climates, is a many-branched plant, growing up to 75 cm (30 in) in cultivated varieties, often shrubby in appearance. The leaves are simple and alternate, elliptical to lanceolate, with smooth margins (entire). The small flowers (around 1.5 cm, or 1 in, in diameter), re borne singly or, rarely, in pairs in the axils (where leaves join stems); they are white or occasionally purple, campanulate (bell-shaped), often with 5 lobes, and contain 5 bluish stamens. The fruits are many-seeded berries--pod-like, but with no sutures—that vary considerably in size and shape, ripening to green, yellow, orange, red, or purple.

The numerous varieties that have been developed are categorized in five major groups: 1) Cerasiforme (cherry peppers); 2) Conoides (cone peppers); 3) Fasciculatum (red cone peppers); 4) Grossum (bell or sweet peppers); and 5) Longum (chili or cayenne peppers). These varieties include well-known Mexican peppers such as jalapeños, serranos, and poblanos. However, some pepper varieties known as chili and cayenne peppers come from the closely related species, C. frutescens, including the Tabasco varieties used in Tabasco sauce, and the intensely spicy Habanero peppers.

Peppers are used fresh, cooked, or dried in an enormous variety of dishes characteristic of different regional cuisines. They are high in vitamins A and C. Some varieties have been developed to use as ornamentals, often for indoor pots; these often have small, brightly-colored, persistent fruits.

Capsaicin, which is obtained from C. annuum and other Capsicum species, is an intense skin and eye irritant, and is the ingredient used in pepper sprays sold for self-defense. However, it also has numerous medical uses, including topical pain relief for muscle soreness, shingles, skin irritations, and rheumatism, and as an anti-inflammatory. Recent medical research has also documented antimicrobial and antifungal activity of capsaicin obtained from several Capsicum species, and on-going studies are exploring its use in cancer treatment.

Although known as pepper, Capsicum annuum is not closely related to the spice known as black pepper (Piper nigrum, in the Piperaceae), which was prominent in the spice trade of the Middle Ages, and for which Christopher Columbus may have been searching when he brought Capsicum annuum to Europe and referred to it by the same common name.

(Bailey et al. 1976, Chowdhury et al. 1996, Cichewicza and Thorpe 1996, Hedrick 1919, van Wyk 2005, Wikipedia 2012.)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Jacqueline Courteau

Supplier: Jacqueline Courteau

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Plains to Mid Altitude, Cultivated, Native of Tropical America"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Much-branched annual or short-lived perennial herb, up to 1.5 m tall, widely cultivated for its edible fruits. Leaves ovate to narrowly lanceolate, 2.5-10 cm long, dark green, thinly textured to somewhat leathery, hairless except for scattered hairs in the axils of veins below; margin more or less entire, wavy. Flowers mostly solitary, white to greenish or bluish-white, drooping. Fruit very variable in shape, size, colour and taste.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Derivation of specific name

annuum: annual
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

"Maharashtra: Nasik, Pune Karnataka: Hassan, Mysore Kerala: All districts Tamil Nadu: All districts"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Aureliana fasciculata var. tomentella (Sendtn.) Barboza & Hunz.:
Argentina (South America)
Brazil (South America)
Mexico (Mesoamerica)
Paraguay (South America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Capsicum fasciculatum Sturtev.:
New Zealand (Oceania)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Capsicum longum A. DC.:
Guatemala (Mesoamerica)
Madagascar (Africa & Madagascar)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
  • Rutenberg, C. 1880-1889. Reliquiae Rutenbergianae. Abh. Naturwiss. Vereine Bremen 7(1): 1–54; 7(2): 198–214; 7(3): 335–365; 9(4): 401–403; 10(3): 369–396.   http://www.tropicos.org/Reference/7755 External link.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Capsicum petenense Standl.:
Guatemala (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Bassovia crassiflora Dunal:
Brazil (South America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Capsicum annuum L.:
Brazil (South America)
Ecuador (South America)
Ethiopia (Africa & Madagascar)
French Guiana (South America)
Guatemala (Mesoamerica)
Guyana (South America)
Honduras (Mesoamerica)
Mexico (Mesoamerica)
Madagascar (Africa & Madagascar)
Panama (Mesoamerica)
Peru (South America)
Suriname (South America)
United States (North America)
Venezuela (South America)
China (Asia)
Colombia (South America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Worldwide distribution

Widely grown cultivars originating from South America.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution: Native to C. America. Widely cultivated elsewhere.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herb up to 1 m tall. Leaves oblong-ovate or broadly so; acute to acuminate. Flowers solitary, dull white, nodding after anthesis.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Shrubs or annual or perennial herbs, 20-80 cm tall. Stems glabrescent. Leaves solitary or paired; petiole 4-7 cm; leaf blade oblong-ovate, ovate, or ovate-lanceolate, 4-13 × 1.5-4 cm, glabrescent, base narrowed, margin entire, apex short acuminate or acute. Inflorescences solitary flowers or few-flowered clusters. Pedicel bent at apex, 1-2 cm. Calyx cup-shaped, undulate, 2-3 × 3 mm. Corolla white, ca. 1 cm. Anthers purplish, 1.8-2 mm. Berry mostly red (orange, yellow, or purple in cultivation), variously shaped, up to 15 cm. Seeds pale yellow, discoid or reniform, 3-5 mm. Fl. May-Aug, fr. Jul-Nov.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Synonym

Capsicum annuum var. conoide (Miller) Irish; C. annuum var. fasciculatum (Sturtevant) Irish; C. annuum var. grossum (Linnaeus) Sendtner; C. conoide Miller; C. fasciculatum Sturtevant; C. frutescens Linnaeus; C. frutescens var. fasciculatum L. Bailey; C. frutescens var. longum L. Bailey; C. frutescens var. grossum L. Bailey; C. grossum Linnaeus; C. longum de Candolle.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat & Distribution

Widely cultivated in China [native to Mexico and South America, widely cultivated and naturalized throughout the world]
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Foodplant / gall
Aceria kuko causes gall of live leaf of Capsicum annuum

Foodplant / parasite
Aculops lycopersici parasitises leaf of Capsicum annuum

Foodplant / parasite
sporangium of Peronospora tabacina parasitises live Capsicum annuum

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
Tomato Spotted Wilt virus causes spots on ring-spotted, unevenly ripening fruit of Capsicum annuum

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Frequency

Rare as an escape
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Capsicum annuum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Capsicum annuum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 13
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
  • Aeschimann, D. & C. Heitz. 2005. Synonymie-Index der Schweizer Flora und der angrenzenden Gebiete (SISF). 2te Auflage. Documenta Floristicae Helvetiae N° 2. Genève.   http://www.crsf.ch/ External link.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Info Flora (CRSF/ZDSF) & Autoren 2005

Supplier: Name It's Source (profile not public)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Uses

Uses: Fruit, Spice/herb/condiment, MEDICINE/DRUG

Comments: A common pepper of Mexican origin.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Capsicum annuum

Capsicum annuum is a species of the plant genus Capsicum native to southern North America and northern South America.[1][3] This species is the most common and extensively cultivated of the five domesticated capsicums. The species encompasses a wide variety of shapes and sizes of peppers, both mild and hot, ranging from bell peppers to chili peppers. Cultivars are descended from the wild American bird pepper still found in warmer regions of the Americas.[4] In the past some woody forms of this species have been called C. frutescens, but the features that were used to distinguish those forms appear in many populations of C. annuum and there is no consistently recognizable C. frutescens species.[5]

Characteristics[edit]

Although the species name annuum means “annual” (from the Latin annus “year”), the plant is not an annual and in the absence of winter frosts can survive several seasons and grow into a large perennial shrub.[6] The single flowers are an off-white (sometimes purplish) color while the stem is densely branched and up to 60 centimetres (24 in) tall. The fruit is a berry and may be green, yellow or red when ripe.[7] While the species can tolerate most climates, C. annuum is especially productive in warm and dry climates.

Uses[edit]

Culinary[edit]

The species is a source of popular sweet peppers and hot chilis with numerous varieties cultivated all around the world.

In British English, the sweet varieties are called red or green peppers[8] and the hot varieties chillies,[9] whereas in Australian and Indian English the name capsicum is commonly used for bell peppers exclusively and chilli is often used to encompass the hotter varieties. Americans call the sweet types "peppers" and the hot ones "chili peppers" or "chilies" (sometimes spelled "chiles").

Sweet peppers are very often used as a bulking agent in ready-made meals and take-away food, because they are cheap, have a strong flavor, and are colorful. Foods containing peppers, especially chili peppers, often have a strong aftertaste due to the presence of capsinoids in peppers. Capsaicin, a chemical found in chili peppers, creates a burning sensation once ingested, which can last for several hours after ingestion.

Medicinal[edit]

Capsicum annuum cultivars

Hot peppers are used in medicine as well as food in Africa[10] and other places around the world.

English botanist John Lindley described C. annuum on page 509 of his 1838 'Flora Medica' thus:

It is employed in medicine, in combination with Cinchona in intermittent and lethargic affections, and also in atonic gout, dyspepsia accompanied by flatulence, tympanitis, paralysis etc. Its most valuable application appears however to be in cynanche maligna (acute diphtheria) and scarlatina maligna (malignent Scarlet fever, used either as a gargle or administered internally.)

In ayurvedic medicine, C. annuum is classified as follows:[11]

  • Gunna (properties) – ruksh (dry), laghu (light) and tikshan (sharp)
  • Rasa dhatu (taste) – katu (pungent)
  • Virya (potency) – ushan (hot)

Ornamental[edit]

Some cultivars grown specifically for their aesthetic value include the U.S. National Arboretum's Black Pearl[12] and the Bolivian Rainbow. Ornamental varieties tend to have unusually colored fruit and foliage with colors such as black and purple being notable. All are edible, and most (like Royal Black) are hot.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Capsicum annuum L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 1997-01-22. Retrieved 2010-07-29. 
  2. ^ "The Plant List". 
  3. ^ Latham, Elizabeth (2009-02-03). "The colourful world of chillies". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 2009-03-08. 
  4. ^ Francis, John K. (2003-09-09). "Capsicum annuum L. bird pepper - USDA Forest Service". Retrieved 2013-09-30. 
  5. ^ Zhi-Yun Zhang, Anmin Lu & William G. D'Arcy. "Capsicum annuum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 188. 1753". Flora of China 17. pp. 313–313. 
  6. ^ Katzer, Gernot (May 27, 2008). "Paprika (Capsicum annuum L.)". Retrieved December 1, 2012. 
  7. ^ Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (1 July 2006). Safety assessment of transgenic organisms: OECD consensus documents. OECD Publishing. pp. 299–. ISBN 978-92-64-02258-4. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  8. ^ Pepper
  9. ^ Chilli
  10. ^ Grubben, G.J.H. & Denton, O.A. (2004) Plant Resources of Tropical Africa 2. Vegetables. PROTA Foundation, Wageningen; Backhuys, Leiden; CTA, Wageningen.
  11. ^ "Capsicum Annuum". Retrieved February 21, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Capsicum annuum "Black Pearl"". U.S. National Arboretum. March 2006. Retrieved February 21, 2011. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Jalapeño

Illustration Capsicum annuum0.jpg
Jalapeño
HeatMedium (SR: 2,500-10,000)
Five Jalapeño peppers

The jalapeño (play /ˌhaləˈpnjo/; Spanish: [xalaˈpeɲo]) is a fruit, a medium sized chili pepper with a warm, burning sensation when eaten. A mature jalapeño is 2–3½ inches (5–9 cm) long and is commonly picked and sold when still green, but occasionally when ripe and red. It is a cultivar of the species Capsicum annuum originating in Mexico. It is named after Xalapa, Veracruz, where it was traditionally cultivated. About 160 square km are dedicated for the cultivation in Mexico, primarily in the Papaloapan river basin in the north of the state of Veracruz and in the Delicias, Chihuahua area. Jalapeños are cultivated on smaller scales in Jalisco, Nayarit, Sonora, Sinaloa, and Chiapas.

Contents

Overview

A jalapeño plant with pods, the purple strips on the stem are anthocyanin, due to the growth under blue-green spectrum fluorescent lighting.

The jalapeño is variously named in Mexico as huachinango and chile gordo. The cuaresmeño closely resembles the jalapeño. The seeds of a cuaresmeño have the heat of a jalapeño, but the flesh has a mild flavor close to a green bell pepper.

As of 1999, 5,500 acres (22 km2) in the United States were dedicated to the cultivation of jalapeños. Most jalapeños are produced in southern New Mexico and western Texas.

Jalapeños are a pod type of Capsicum. The growing period is 70–80 days. When mature, the plant stands two and a half to three feet tall. Typically a plant produces twenty-five to thirty-five pods. During a growing period, a plant will be picked multiple times. As the growing season ends, jalapeños start to turn red. Jalapeños thrive in a number of soil types, and temperatures if they are provided with adequate water. Once picked, individual peppers ripen to red of their own accord. The peppers can be eaten green or red.

Jalapeños have 2,500 - 8,000 Scoville heat units. Compared to other chilis, the jalapeño has a heat level that varies from mild to hot depending on cultivation and preparation. The heat, caused by capsaicin and related compounds, is concentrated in the membrane (placenta) surrounding the seeds, which are called picante. Handling fresh jalapeños may cause skin irritation. Some handlers wear latex or vinyl gloves while cutting, skinning, or seeding jalapeños. When preparing jalapeños, hands should not come in contact with the eyes as this leads to burning and redness.

Jalapeño is of Nahuatl and Spanish origin. The Spanish suffix -eño signifies that the noun originates in the place modified by the suffix, similar to the English -(i)an. The jalapeño is named after the Mexican town of Xalapa (also spelled Jalapa). Xalapa is itself of Nahuatl derivation, formed from roots xal-li "sand" and a-pan "water place."

Serving styles

  • Chiles toreados are fresh jalapeños that are sauteed in oil until the skin is blistered all over. They are sometimes served with melted cheese on top.
  • Chipotles are smoked, ripe jalapeños.
  • Jalapeño jelly can be prepared using jelling methods.
  • Jalapeño peppers are often muddled and served in mixed drinks.
  • Jalapeño poppers, also called armadillo eggs, are an appetizer; jalapeños are stuffed with cheese, usually cheddar or cream cheese, breaded or wrapped in bacon, and cooked.[1][2]
  • Stuffed jalapeños are hollowed out fresh jalapeños (served cooked or raw) that are stuffed, often with a mix containing seafood, meat, poultry, and/or cheese.
  • Texas toothpicks are jalapeños and onions shaved into straws, lightly breaded, and deep fried.[3]

See also

References

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Dundicut

Dried dundicut peppers
Dundicut
Heat Very hot

Dundicuts are a variety of small, round (approx. 1/2" to 1" diameter), dark red chili peppers grown in Pakistan. Dundicuts are similar in size and flavor to Scotch bonnet peppers, but not as hot, and are of a different species. A major commercial spice vendor describes dundicuts as "quite hot, with a full-bodied, complex flavor. A single crushed pepper will add heat and flavor to a dish for two."[1] Dundicuts have a heat rating of 55,000-65,000 Scoville Units.[1]

References

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Fresno pepper

Fresno pepper
HeatMedium (SR: 2,500-10,000)

The Fresno chili pepper a cultivar of Capsicum annuum, with bell peppers and other chili peppers. It is similar to the Jalapeño pepper but it is significantly hotter (2500-10000 Scoville units) increasing in heat as it ripens. It is frequently used for ceviche and making salsa. They do not dry well and are not good for chili powder.

Health benefits

Since the Fresno chili is riper and redder than the jalapeño, it has more vitamins, most notably Vitamin C. They are an excellent source of B vitamins, and contain significant amounts of iron, thiamin, niacin, magnesium and riboflavin. They are low in calories, fat, and sodium.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ Specialtyproduce


Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Bell pepper

Red, yellow and green pepper

Bell pepper, also known as sweet pepper, capsicum or a pepper (in the UK), is a cultivar group of the species Capsicum annuum (chili pepper). Cultivars of the plant produce fruits in different colors, including red, yellow, orange and green. Bell peppers are sometimes grouped with less pungent pepper varieties as "sweet peppers". Peppers are native to Mexico, Central America and northern South America. Pepper seeds were later carried to Spain in 1493 and from there spread to other European, African and Asian countries. Today, Mexico remains one of the major pepper producers in the world.

Contents

Nomenclature

The misleading name "pepper" (pimiento in Spanish) was given by Christopher Columbus upon bringing the plant back to Europe. At that time peppercorns, the fruit of Piper nigrum, an unrelated plant originating from India, were a highly prized condiment; the name "pepper" was at that time applied in Europe to all known spices with a hot and pungent taste and so naturally extended to the newly discovered Capsicum genus. The most commonly used alternative name of the plant family, "chili", is of Central American origin. Bell peppers are botanically fruits, but are generally considered in culinary contexts to be vegetables.

While the bell pepper is a member of the Capsicum genus, it is the only Capsicum apart from Capsicum rhomboideum that does not produce capsaicin,[1] a lipophilic chemical that can cause a strong burning sensation when it comes in contact with mucous membranes. The lack of capsaicin in bell peppers is due to a recessive form of a gene that eliminates capsaicin and, consequently, the "hot" taste usually associated with the rest of the Capsicum genus.[2]

The term "bell pepper" or "pepper" or "capsicum" is often used for any of the large bell shaped capsicum fruits, regardless of their color. In British English, the fruit is simply referred to as a "pepper", or additionally by colour (as in the term "green pepper", for example), whereas in many Commonwealth of Nations countries, such as Australia, India, Malaysia and New Zealand, they are called "capsicum". Across Europe, the term "paprika", which has its roots in the word for pepper, is used—sometimes referred to by their color (e.g., "groene paprika", "gele paprika", in Dutch, which are green and yellow, respectively). Paprika also refers to the powdered spice made from the fruits in the Capsicum genus.[3] In France, it is called "poivron", with the same root as "poivre" (meaning "pepper"), or "piment". In Korea, the word 피망 ("piman" from the French) refers to green bell peppers, whereas 파프리카 ("papurika" from paprika) refers to bell peppers of other colors.

Varieties

The color can be green, red, yellow, orange and more rarely, white, rainbow (between stages of ripening) and purple, depending on when they are harvested and the specific cultivar. Green peppers are less sweet and slightly more bitter than red, yellow or orange peppers. The taste of ripe peppers can also vary with growing conditions and post-harvest storage treatment; the sweetest are fruit allowed to ripen fully on the plant in full sunshine, while fruit harvested green and after-ripened in storage are less sweet.

Bell pepper
HeatNone (SR:0)
Pepper, sweet, green raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy84 kJ (20 kcal)
Carbohydrates4.64 g
- Sugars2.40 g
- Dietary fiber1.7 g
Fat0.17 g
Protein0.86 g
Thiamine (Vit. B1)0.057 mg (5%)
Riboflavin (Vit. B2)0.028 mg (2%)
Niacin (Vit. B3)0.480 mg (3%)
Pantothenic acid (B5)0.099 mg (2%)
Vitamin B60.224 mg (17%)
Folate (Vit. B9)10 μg (3%)
Vitamin C80.4 mg (97%)
Calcium10 mg (1%)
Iron0.34 mg (3%)
Magnesium10 mg (3%)
Phosphorus20 mg (3%)
Potassium175 mg (4%)
Zinc0.13 mg (1%)
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

Nutritional value

Compared to green peppers, red peppers have more vitamins and nutrients and contain the antioxidant lycopene. The level of carotene, like lycopene, is nine times higher in red peppers. Red peppers have twice the vitamin C content of green peppers.[4] Also, one large red bell pepper contains 209 mg of vitamin C, which is almost three times the 70 mg of an average orange.

Production

Bell and Chile pepper production (tonnes)[5]
Country2004200520062007
 China12,031,03112,530,18013,031,00014,033,000
 Mexico1,431,2581,617,2641,681,2771,690,000
 Indonesia1,100,5141,058,0231,100,0001,100,000
 Turkey1,700,0001,829,0001,842,1751,090,921
 Spain1,077,0251,063,5011,074,1001,065,000
 United States978,890959,070998,210855,870
 Nigeria720,000721,000721,500723,000
 Egypt467,433460,000470,000475,000
 Korea, South410,281395,293352,966345,000
 Netherlands318,000345,000318,000340,000
 Romania237,240203,751279,126280,000
 Ghana270,000270,000277,000279,000
 Italy362,430362,994345,152252,194
 Tunisia255,000256,000256,000250,000
 Algeria265,307248,614275,888233,000
 Hungary126,133113,371206,419207,000
 Morocco182,340190,480235,570192,000
 Serbia*159,741167,477177,255150,257
 Japan153,400154,000146,900150,000
 Israel129,100134,700150,677136,000
 World24,587,12425,261,25926,252,90726,056,900
  • Note: Serbia before 2006 incl. Montenegro

Gallery

See also

References

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

The species includes forms with sweet or pungent fruits. The fruits are an important vegetable and flavoring, and the seed oil is edible. Fruits are used medicinally for inducing sweat. Plants are sometimes cultivated as ornamentals. During its long cultivation, many cultivars have been selected with very different fruit appearance. 

 The practice of referring woody plants of this species to Capsicum frutescens Linnaeus has little merit since herbaceous plants often become woody with age, and other characters supposed to distinguish the two species occur in various populations in both herbaceous and woody plants.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments

There are several varieties of the red and yellow ‘chillies’ grown both for ornamental and edible purposes. The more common ones cultivated in Pakistan are var. grossum (E.) Sendt. (Sweet or Bell pepper), var. cerasiforme Irish (Cherry pepper) with ± globular capsule and var. acuminate Fingerh (Red pepper or lal mirch) with elongated berry. Widely used to add spice to the food or as a vegetable. Also a source of Vitamin c.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: For North America and the U.S. Caribbean, Kartesz (1999) recognizes two varieties of Capsicum annuum, with var. annuum present in this range only as an exotic, and var. glabriusculum present as a native (although an exotic in portions of its range). Two other varieties have sometimes been recognized: var. aviculare is included by Kartesz in his var. glabriusculum, and var. frutescens is included by him in his var. annuum. LEM 17Jan00.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!