Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

This perennial plant consists of a twining vine up to 20-30' long. It will climb adjacent vegetation readily, or sprawl across the ground in open areas. The terete stems are usually hairless, but sometimes pubescent, and often reddish purple. Along the stems are alternate leaves up to 6" long and 4" across. These leaves are usually cordate and hairless, although sometimes the smaller leaves are ovate. They have long hairless petioles and smooth margins. Both the upper and lower surfaces of the leaves are olive green, while the petioles are often reddish purple. Flowering stalks develop from the axils of the leaves; each flowering stalk has a cluster of 1-5 funnelform flowers. The corolla of each flower is white, except for rosy pink or reddish purple coloration deep within its throat. The corolla has 5 shallow lobes; it is about 2½-3" across when it is fully open and similarly in length. The stamens of the flower are white; they project slightly from the throat of the corolla. The blunt overlapping sepals are light green, hairless, and about ½-¾" long; they often have narrow ridges. The flowers bloom during the morning (or during the afternoon on cloudy days), and they are individually short-lived. However, a typical plant will bloom for about 2 months during mid- to late summer. Each flower is replaced by a 2-celled capsule that contains 2-4 seeds. These flat seeds are conspicuously hairy along their outer edges, and pubescent elsewhere. The root system produces a large tuber that can lie several feet beneath the ground surface and weigh up to 20-30 lb. Cultivation
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Range and Habitat in Illinois

The native Wild Sweet Potato occurs occasionally in most counties of Illinois, except in the extreme north and NW areas of the state, where it is uncommon or absent (see Distribution Map). Habitats include upland woodlands, edges of prairies near woodlands, rocky streambanks, thickets, fence rows, abandoned fields, and areas along railroads and roadsides. This plant is more often seen in disturbed habitats, but it can be found in higher quality habitats as well.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea brevipes Peter:
Guatemala (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea schrenkiana Peter:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea sabulosa var. mollicella House:
Mexico (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea pandurata Conz. & L.C. Sm.:
Mexico (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea sidaefolia (Kunth) Choisy:
Bolivia (South America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea sabulosa var. hirtella House:
Mexico (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea sabulosa House:
Mexico (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea sidaefolia Choisy:
Bolivia (South America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea nicoyana House:
Costa Rica (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea pandurata (L.) G. Mey.:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea lindenii M. Martens & Galeotti:
Belize (Mesoamerica)
Colombia (South America)
Costa Rica (Mesoamerica)
Ecuador (South America)
El Salvador (Mesoamerica)
Guatemala (Mesoamerica)
Honduras (Mesoamerica)
Mexico (Mesoamerica)
Nicaragua (Mesoamerica)
Panama (Mesoamerica)
Peru (South America)
Venezuela (South America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea flavida L.O. Williams:
Guatemala (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ipomoea armentalis L.O. Williams:
Guatemala (Mesoamerica)
Mexico (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Physical Description

Type Information

Holotype for Ipomoea flavida L.O. Williams
Catalog Number: US 1335960
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Verified from the card file of type specimens
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): H. von Türckheim
Year Collected: 1912
Locality: Panzal., Baja Verapaz, Guatemala, Central America
  • Holotype: Williams, L. O. 1970. Fieldiana, Bot. 32: 190.
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Holotype for Ipomoea sabulosa var. hirtella House
Catalog Number: US 233075
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): E. W. Nelson
Year Collected: 1895
Locality: Near San Cristobal, Chiapas, Mexico, North America
Elevation (m): 2134 to 2438
  • Holotype: House, H. D. 1908. Ann. New York Acad. Sci. 18: 228.
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Isotype for Ipomoea nicoyana House
Catalog Number: US 577820
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. Tonduz
Year Collected: 1900
Locality: Near Nicoya, Costa Rica, Central America
  • Isotype: House, H. D. 1908. Ann. New York Acad. Sci. 18: 231.
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Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

The native Wild Sweet Potato occurs occasionally in most counties of Illinois, except in the extreme north and NW areas of the state, where it is uncommon or absent (see Distribution Map). Habitats include upland woodlands, edges of prairies near woodlands, rocky streambanks, thickets, fence rows, abandoned fields, and areas along railroads and roadsides. This plant is more often seen in disturbed habitats, but it can be found in higher quality habitats as well.
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Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Wild Sweet Potato in Illinois

Ipomoea pandurata (Wild Sweet Potato)
(Also called Man-of-the-Earth; bees suck nectar or collect pollen; other insects suck nectar; observations are from Robertson)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn; Apidae (Bombini): Bombus auricomus sn fq, Bombus griseocallis sn, Bombus pensylvanica sn cp fq, Bombus vagans sn; Anthophoridae (Emphorini): Melitoma taurea sn cp fq olg, Ptilothrix bombiformis sn fq; Anthophoridae (Epeolini): Triepeolus remigatus sn; Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Cemolobus ipomoeae sn cp fq olg, Melissodes bimaculata bimaculata sn cp fq, Peponapis pruinosa pruinosa sn fq, Svastra atripes atripes sn, Svastra obliqua obliqua sn, Xenoglossa strenua sn fq

Butterflies
Papilionidae: Battus philenor sn, Papilio troilus sn

Skippers
Hesperiidae: Poanes zabulon sn

Moths
Sphingidae: Sphinx eremitus sn

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Faunal Associations

The flowers primarily attract long-tongued bees, including honeybees, bumblebees, and digger bees (Melissodes spp.). Some oligolectic bees that visit the flowers of the Wild Sweet Potato and other Ipomoea spp. include Melitoma taurea (Mallow Bee) and Cemolobus ipomoea (Morning Glory Bee). These insects seek nectar primarily, although the oligolectic bees collect pollen as well. Less common visitors to the flowers include nectar-seeking swallowtail butterflies, skippers, and sphinx moths. Like other Ipomoea spp., Wild Sweet Potato attracts numerous tortoise beetles and other beetles that feed on the foliage. These species include Agroiconota bivittata (Striped Tortoise Beetle), Charidotella purpurata (Tortoise Beetle sp.), Charidotella sexpunctata (Golden Tortoise Beetle), Chelymorpha cassidea (Argus Tortoise Beetle), Jonthonota nigripes (Black-Legged Tortoise Beetle), Opacinota bisignata (Tortoise Beetle sp.), Strongylocassis atripes (Tortoise Beetle sp.), Chaetocnema confinis (Sweet Potato Flea Beetle), and Typophorus nigritus (Sweet Potato Leaf Beetle). Larvae of the Sweet Potato Flea Beetle and Sweet Potato Leaf Beetle also feed on the roots. Larvae of a long-horned beetle, Phaea monostigma, bore through the stems of Ipomoea spp. The caterpillars of such moths as Agrius cingulatus (Pink-Spotted Hawk Moth), Bedellia somnulentella (Sweet Potato Leaf-Miner), and Emmelina monodactyla (Morning Glory Plume Moth) also feed on these plants. Because the foliage is bitter and somewhat toxic, it is avoided by mammalian herbivores as a food source. Because its long leafy stems often form dense thicket tangles, Wild Sweet Potato provides excellent cover for birds and other kinds of wildlife during the summer and early fall.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ipomoea pandurata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Uses

Uses: MEDICINE/DRUG

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Wikipedia

Ipomoea pandurata

Ipomoea pandurata the Wild Potato Vine, Big-rooted Morning Glory, Man-of-the-Earth or Manroot is a species of herbaceous perennial vine.

It is rarely cultivated but grows wild in North America appearing along roadsides, in fields and along fence rows. Arising from a deep vertical root, this perennial vine with alternate leaves, entwines itself over other vegetation.[1] It sustains itself over the winter with a tuberous root similar to its better known relative, the Sweet Potato (I. batatas).

Contents

Identification [edit]

The plant is a "trailing vine" with "singly attached heart shaped leaves" and white bell shaped flowers,(2-4 inches, or 5-10 centimeters in size) which have pink to purple centers. The root is "large, vertical, [and] deeply buried"

Uses [edit]

The tuber can be baked or boiled like a potato. The taste can be described as a sweet potato that is somewhat bitter. Caution should be taken as some roots have more of a bitter taste than others and ought to be boiled in "several changes of water."

Warning [edit]

The roots when left uncooked have purgative properties.[2]

References [edit]

  1. ^ "Big Root Morning Glory Wildflower". 
  2. ^ Peterson, Lee, "A Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants of Eastern and Central North America", p. 20, Houghton Mifflin Company, New York City, accessed 22 November 2010. ISBN 0-395-20445-3

Media related to Ipomoea pandurata at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Ipomoea pandurata at Wikispecies


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