Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: California state endemic. Known from the approximate triangle formed by Victorville, Lucerne Valley and Barstow. Known only from San Bernardino County. Range extent is approximately 1560 sq miles.

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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Can be distinguished from another mimulus that occurs in the area by its smaller size, and flower color.

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Type Information

Isosyntype for Mimulus mohavensis Lemmon
Catalog Number: US 86015
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): J. G. Lemmon & S. Plummer
Year Collected: 1884
Locality: Calico, Mojave Desert., California, United States, North America
  • Isosyntype: Lemmon, J. G. 1884. Bot. Gaz. 9: 142.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: In the Western Mojave desert. Gravely banks of desert washes. 2000-3500 ft. Mojavean desert scrub and Joshua Tree Woodland.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

Comments: In 2005/06, CNDDB knew of at least 36 EO's, 12 of which were historic. An additional 22 new pieces of data are in the backlog, but many may be updates.

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General Ecology

Dependent on spring rains as an annual.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: ANNUAL

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Reproduction

Other related species are insect-pollinated, mostly outcross, but are also self compatible (Leclerc-Potvin and Ritland 1994). The dispersal vectors are probably abiotic, due to the size of this plant and its annual habit.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: Historically fairly abundant in a restricted area in the western Mojave, Mimulus mohavensis is now known from perhaps 25 sites in California. It is endemic to San Bernardino County. The population numbers fluctuate annually depending on rainfall. Many threats affect this plant including development, ORV use, mining, grazing and weeds. It is likely that no sites currently receive adequate protection. Better data are needed by the heritage program.

Environmental Specificity: Narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements common.

Comments: Known only from fairly narrow range in the Western Mojave Desert.

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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 10-30%

Comments: The short term trend is one of partial decline.

Global Long Term Trend: Relatively stable to decline of 50%

Comments: The long term trend is one of partial decline due to habitat loss and degradation.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Very high - high

Comments: Threats include development of public land in Stoddard Valley, energy development, mining, and off-road vehicle use. Sheep grazing is a threat in certain parts of its range. Additional threats include road building, power line construction, and weed encroachment.

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Management

Biological Research Needs: 1. Ecology
2. Genetics

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Wikipedia

Mimulus mohavensis

Mimulus mohavensis is a species of monkeyflower known by the common name Mojave monkeyflower.

Distribution[edit]

It is endemic to San Bernardino County, California, where it is known only from the Mojave Desert. It has been found in several locations in and around Barstow, often in gravelly, sandy habitat such as arroyos.

The historical range of the plant was wider than it is today; many occurrences have been extirpated.[1] The population sizes and abundance vary, as they probably depend on annual rainfall amounts.[2]

Description[edit]

Mimulus mohavensis is a small, hairy annual herb growing at ground level or erect to a maximum height near 10 centimeters. The oppositely arranged leaves are narrow oval in shape and under 3 centimeters in length. The herbage is usually reddish green to red-purple in color. The tubular base of the tiny flower is encapsulated in a hairy, ribbed calyx of red sepals with pointed lobes. The flower has a flat face with five rounded, equal lobes. The corolla lobes are dark-veined pink at the bases and white at the edges. It blooms between April and June.[2]

References[edit]

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