Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (1) (learn more)

Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats, Evergreen Forests , Cultivated, Native of Tropical America"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This perennial woody vine is up to 40' long, branching occasionally. Trumpet Creeper usually climbs up trees, shrubs, telephone poles, and other vertical structures using aerial rootlets, otherwise it sprawls across the ground. Young shoots are greenish brown, but become brown and woody as they mature. Pairs of opposite compound leaves occur along the length of the vine. These compound leaves are odd pinnate, consisting of about 7-11 leaflets; they are up to 2½' long and ¾' across. The central stalk of each compound leaf is often hairy. The leaflets are up to 3" long and 1" across. They are ovate or elliptic, pinnately veined, and coarsely toothed along the margins. The upper surface of each leaflet is shiny and hairless, while the lower surface often has a few hairs along the major veins. Periodically, short cymes of 2-8 flowers are produced along the length of the vine. These flowers are up to 3½" long and have an elongated funnelform shape that is trumpet-like in appearance. The corolla is orange to reddish orange; along its outer rim there are 5 shallow lobes that curl backward. The tubular calyx is reddish orange, leathery in texture, and 5-toothed; it is much shorter than the corolla. Along the inner surface of the corolla, there are reddish lines that function as nectar guides and 4 inserted stamens. There are extra-floral nectaries at the base of each flower. The blooming period occurs during the summer and lasts about 2 months. The abundance of flowers is variable; there is no floral scent. Each flower is replaced by an elongated seed capsule about 6" long that tapers at both ends. This seed capsule eventually splits apart into two sections to release the seeds. The seeds are flattened and have large membranous wings; they are dispersed by the wind. The root system consists of a woody taproot.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

General: Bignonia Family (Bignoniaceae). Trumpet creeper is a deciduous or partly evergreen vine that climbs by aerial rootlets and twining stems. This is a U.S. native. Stems can grow up to 12 m long and have numerous aerial rootlets. Leaves are opposite, pinnately compound and coarsely toothed, composed of 7, 9, or 11 leaflets. Leaflets are somewhat shiny and dark green. Flowers are yellow-orange to red, tubular, and up to 8 cm long and 4 cm wide at the mouth. Flowers are born in clusters of four to a dozen and bloom from July through August. The fruit is a flat, tapered capsule, 8-13 cm long with seeds that are flat and winged.

Distinguishing characters of trumpet creeper include its U-shaped bundle scars on the stem, abundant root-like aerial stems, opposite compound leaves that are coarsely toothed, large trumpet-shaped flowers, and its light tan bark that appears flaky on mature stems.

Distribution: Trumpet creeper is native to eastern, north-central, and south-central portions of the United States and has become naturalized in New England. Its natural range occurs from New Jersey to Ontario and Iowa, and south to Florida and Texas. For current distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.

Habitat: Trumpet creeper is found in thickets, dry woods, waste grounds, railroads, disturbed sites, clearings, and along roadsides and fencerows.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Alternative names

Bignonia radicans, cow-itch, Gelseminum radicans, Tecoma radicans, Tecoma speciosa, trumpet flower, trumpet vine.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Tamil Nadu: Dindigul
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Trumpet Creeper is native to the southern half of Illinois and adventive in the northern half of the state. It is fairly common in the southern portion of its range, becoming less common or absent in the north. Habitats include open woodlands, woodland edges, thickets, savannas, gravelly seeps with woody vegetation, riverbanks, limestone glades, fence rows, lawn trees, telephone poles, areas along roads and railroads, and abandoned fields. Sometimes Trumpet Creeper is grown as an ornamental plant in yards. It tolerates various kinds of disturbance.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Bignonia radicans L.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Campsis radicans (L.) Bureau:
Ecuador (South America)
Peru (South America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution: A native of N.America. Widely cultivated.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Adaptation

The USDA hardiness zones for trumpet creeper are 4-10. It grows in wet to dry soils and sand, loam, or clay soil types with a pH range of 3.7 to 6.8. Trumpet creeper prefers full sun for best flowering.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Similar to the preceeding species but pubescent, larger leaves and beaked capsule. It also grows earlier in the year.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Climbing shrub
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Trumpet Creeper is native to the southern half of Illinois and adventive in the northern half of the state. It is fairly common in the southern portion of its range, becoming less common or absent in the north. Habitats include open woodlands, woodland edges, thickets, savannas, gravelly seeps with woody vegetation, riverbanks, limestone glades, fence rows, lawn trees, telephone poles, areas along roads and railroads, and abandoned fields. Sometimes Trumpet Creeper is grown as an ornamental plant in yards. It tolerates various kinds of disturbance.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects and Birds of Trumpet Creeper in Illinois

Campsis radicans (Trumpet Creeper)
(Hummingbirds suck nectar from flowers, while orioles perforate [prf] the flowers near their corollas to steal nectar [sn@prf], and sometimes hummingbirds sucked nectar from these perforations as well; according to Robertson, bees collect pollen from flowers & are non-pollinating, however Bertin found that the honeybee and bumblebees sometimes sucked nectar within the flowers and successfully pollinated them; Halictid bees, ants, and flies suck nectar from extra-floral nectaries; observations are from Robertson and Bertin)

Flower visitors:

Birds
Trochilidae: Archilochus colubris sn fq sn@prf (Rb, Brt), Icterus galbula prf sn@prf np (Brt), Icterus spurius prf sn@prf np (Brt)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn cp (Brt); Apidae (Bombini): Bombus spp. sn cp (Brt), Bombus pensylvanica cp fq np (Rb)

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Unidentified spp. cp np (Brt), Lasioglossum zephyrus cp np (Rb)

Moths
Sphingidae: Manduca sexta sn (Brt)

Extra-floral nectary visitors:

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Lasioglossum imitatus sn fq (Rb), Lasioglossum versatus sn fq (Rb), Lasioglossum zephyrus sn fq (Rb)

Ants
Formicidae: Crematogaster lineolata sn fq (Rb), Formica fusca sn fq (Rb), Formica schaufussi sn (Rb), Tapinoma sessilis sn (Rb)

Flies
Syrphidae: Syritta pipiens sn (Rb); Sarcophagidae: Helicobia rapax sn (Rb), Ravinia anxia sn (Rb), Ravinia stimulans sn (Rb); Calliphoridae: Lucilia sericata sn (Rb); Muscidae: Musca domestica sn (Rb), Stomoxys calcitrans sn (Rb); Milichiidae: Milichiella lucidula sn fq (Rb); Otitidae: Delphinia picta sn fq (Rb)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Faunal Associations

The nectar of the flowers attracts the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird, Baltimore Oriole, Orchard Oriole and some Sphinx moths; the hummingbird and sphinx moths are effective pollinators, while the orioles have a tendency to tear-up the flowers, causing more harm than good. Bumblebees and honeybees sometimes seek nectar or pollen from the flowers, but they are probably less effective pollinators. The extra-floral nectaries attract an abundance of ants and flies; to a lesser extent, Halictid bees visit the extra-floral nectaries as well. The caterpillars of Paratraea plebeja (Plebeian Sphinx) feed on the foliage, as do the adults and larvae of the leaf beetle, Octotoma plicatula. The caterpillars of Clydonopteron tecomae (Trumpet Creeper Moth) feed on the seedpods and their contents. The foliage is toxic to mammalian herbivores and little bothered by them; a small number of people may experience a rash from contact with the foliage. Because of the luxuriant leaves and rampant growth of this vine, it provides good cover and nesting habitat for many species of songbirds.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl.Per.: May-July.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Campsis radicans

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Campsis radicans

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Status

Trumpet creeper is an invasive weed. Please consult the PLANTS Web site (http://plants.usda.gov) and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status (e.g. threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values).

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Pests and potential problems

Planthoppers may occasionally feed on trumpet vine but generally do not cause serious damage. Leaf spots caused by various fungi may be seen but are not serious. Mildew causes a white powdery growth on the leaves.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Control

Please contact your local agricultural extension specialist or county weed specialist to learn what works best in your area and how to use it safely.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Cultivars, improved and selected materials (and area of origin)

The NRCS Plant Materials Program has not released any cultivars of trumpet creeper for conservation use. Contact your local Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly Soil Conservation Service) office for more information. Look in the phone book under ”United States Government.” The Natural Resources Conservation Service will be listed under the subheading “Department of Agriculture.”

Ornamental cultivars of trumpet creeper include ‘Atropurpurea,’ ‘Crimson Trumpet,’ ‘Flamenco,’ ‘Flava,’ ‘Madame Galen,’ ‘Minor,’ ‘Praecox,’ ‘Speciosa,’ and ‘Variegata.’ These cultivars have been bred for flower and foliage color and for rapid growth.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Seed production

Trumpet creeper is typically propagated by cuttings. It readily roots and develops new suckers that allow the species to grow rapidly.

Seeds are prepared for germination by stratifying them in moist sand for 60 days at 4oC and 30% relative humidity. Fungicide should be added to the sand to prevent mildew formation. For spring outplanting, seeds are sown in early fall. Sixty percent germination will occur within two weeks of removal from stratification conditions. There is no special treatment required for establishment other than monitoring for water needs.

During the active growth phase, plants will need to be cutback to encourage root growth and prevent the tangling of foliage. Seedlings will need to harden in winter-like temperatures before outplanting.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

If not controlled, rampant growth will become a problem. Vines should be thinned throughout the growing season and cut back in winter to prevent aggressive spread.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Weediness

This plant may become weedy or invasive in some regions or habitats and may displace desirable vegetation if not properly managed. Please consult with your local NRCS Field Office, Cooperative Extension Service office, or state natural resource or agriculture department regarding its status and use. Weed information is also available from the PLANTS Web site at plants.usda.gov.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

Typical growing conditions are partial sun, mesic levels of moisture, and various kinds of soil, including loam, clay-loam, and rocky. Full sun is also tolerated. This aggressive vine requires ample space and vertical support. It has few problems with pests and disease.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Uses

Ornamental: The showy flowers of trumpet creeper make this plant appropriate for some gardening and landscaping needs. It is often used as a cover for fences, arbors, walls, pillars or large trellises and as a groundcover. The cigar-like fruit may be considered decorative during winter.

Wildlife: The tubular flowers and large quantities of nectar produced by trumpet creeper are attractants for

hummingbirds and butterflies. The vines also provide habitat to ants.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Risks

Warning

Warning: Contact with the leaves and flowers of trumpet creeper results in skin redness and swelling among mammals. It is also slightly toxic if ingested.
Public Domain

USDA NRCS National Plant Data Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Campsis radicans

Campsis radicans (trumpet vine[1] or trumpet creeper,[1] also known in North America as cow itch vine[citation needed] or hummingbird vine[citation needed]), is a species of flowering plant of the family Bignoniaceae, native to the southeastern United States. Growing to 10 m (33 ft), it is a vigorous, deciduous woody vine, notable for its showy trumpet-shaped flowers. It inhabits woodlands and riverbanks, and is also a popular garden subject.

Typical leaf

Description[edit source | edit]

The leaves are opposite, ovate, pinnate, 3–10 cm long, and emerald green when new, maturing into a dark green. The flowers come in terminal cymes of 4–12, orange to red in color with a yellowish throat, and generally appear after several months of warm weather.

Ecology[edit source | edit]

The flowers are very attractive to hummingbirds, and many types of birds like to nest in the dense foliage. The flowers are followed by large seed pods. As these mature, they dry and split. Hundreds of thin, brown, paper-like seeds are released. These are easily grown when stratified.

Etymology[edit source | edit]

The Latin specific epithet radicans means "with stems that take root".[2]

Garden history[edit source | edit]

The flamboyant flowering of Campsis radicans made it obvious to even the least botanically-minded of the first English colonists in Virginia. Consequently the plant quickly made its way to England early in the 17th century. Its botanical parentage, as a hardy member of a mostly subtropical group, made its naming problematic: according to John Parkinson, the Virginia settlers were at first calling it a jasmine or a honeysuckle, and then a bellflower; he classed it in the genus Apocynum (dogbane). Joseph Pitton de Tournefort erected a catch-all genus Bignonia in 1700, from which it has since been extricated.[3]

Cultivation[edit source | edit]

The vigor of the trumpet vine should not be underestimated. In warm weather, it puts out huge numbers of tendrils that grab onto every available surface, and eventually expand into heavy woody stems several centimeters in diameter. It grows well on arbors, fences, telephone poles, and trees, although it may dismember them in the process. Ruthless pruning is recommended. Outside of its native range this species has the potential to be highly invasive, even as far north as New England. The trumpet vine thrives in many places in southern Canada as well.

Away from summer heat, C. radicans is less profuse of flower. A larger-flowered hybrid 'Mme Galen' was introduced about 1889 by the Tagliabue nurserymen of Laniate near Milan.[3]

The form C. radicans f. flava has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[4]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

The flowers have been observed in both the species to be visited by Humming birds and ants which bore a hole at the base of the corolla tube to get at the nectary.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!