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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Myosotis soleirolii is an endemic species from Corsica and Sardinia with Paleotemperate origins. It is a rare species in the central mountains of Corsica from Rotondo to Incudine mountains. In Sardinia, it is found in the Gennargentu mountains.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Myosotis sylvatica Ehrh. ex Hoffm.:
Canada (North America)
Ecuador (South America)
United States (North America)
South Africa (Africa & Madagascar)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution: N. Africa, Europe, Turkey, USSR, Pakistan, Kashmir eastward to Bhutan.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennial up to 30 cm tall. Stem erect, simple, sometimes with few branches, sparsely to densely vinous. Basal leaves elliptic-oblong to oblanceolate, 30-50 x 15-30 mm. Cauline leaves oblanceolate, sometimes lanceolate-obtuse, apiculate, uppermost ones similar but smaller and sessile. Inflorescence in flower short and crowded, in fruit loose and elongated, with fruiting calyx up to 16 mm apart. Fruiting pedicel exceeding calyx length. Calyx ½ to ¾th partite into lanceolate lobes, covered with spreading hairs, those on the lower connate part uncinate, base gradually (not abruptly) tapering, in fruit wide open. Corolla limb 5-7 mm broad; blue or bluish-purple. Nutlets c. 1.5 mm, oblong, upper half keeled vent-rally, acutish at tip with a narrow margin all around, blackish-brown, smooth and shiny.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species is found on runnels, edges of streamlets from 160 m to 2,050 m of altitude. This Hemicryptophyte grows principally on granite. At the moment, information about germination, growing and flowering conditions is not available - more research is needed.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
cleistothecium of Golovinomyces cynoglossi parasitises live Myosotis sylvatica

Foodplant / parasite
oospore of Peronospora myosotidis parasitises live Myosotis sylvatica

Plant / resting place / within
puparium of Phytomyza myosotica may be found in leaf-mine of Myosotis sylvatica
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / spot causer
amphigenous colony of Ramularia hyphomycetous anamorph of Ramularia cerinthes causes spots on live leaf of Myosotis sylvatica

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per.: June-August.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Myosotis sylvatica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 8
Specimens with Barcodes: 8
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Hugot, L.

Reviewer/s
Hugot, L., Bagella, S., Muller, S.D. & Temple, H. (IUCN Species Programme)

Contributor/s

Justification
Myosotis soleirolii has a restricted distribution, but the populations appear to be stable, and it is not believed to approach the criteria for listing in a threatened category. It is therefore listed as Least Concern.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Population

Population

Myosotis soleirolii is known from 35 sites in Corsica. It has last been observed at the site of Rotondo in 2007.

The populations are affected by the hydrological conditions, but the global trend is not known. The lower altitude populations are found in flooded areas, so if the water level drops these are likely to disappear.


Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
The major threats to this species are drought and decreasing water quality.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species is legally protected on a regional level (Corsica) and is included in the French national Red List. Surveillance of the existing sites is done by guards from both the Regional Natural Park of Corsica and Botanical Conservatory from Corsica; search for new locations is underway.
It is recommended to study the dynamics of different populations; to increase knowledge about its biology, resilience and conservation; and to collect seeds for ex situ conservation.
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Wikipedia

Myosotis sylvatica

Myosotis sylvatica (wood forget-me-not or just forget-me-not) is a species of flowering plant in the family Boraginaceae, native to Europe.

Contents

Description [edit]

It is a short-lived herbaceous perennial or biennial growing to 12–30 cm (5–12 in) tall by 15 cm (6 in) wide, with hairy leaves and a profusion of disc-shaped, intensely blue (occasionally white) flowers in Spring.

General view
Close up of calyx, background lines are 5mm apart
Calyx in its stem
Close up of flower, background square is 5mm across
Flower head - note how flat the petals are
Calyx with mature fruit inside, background lines are 5mm apart
Side 1 of mature fruit, background lines are 5mm apart
Side 2 of mature fruit, background lines are 5mm apart
Close up of stem, background square is 5mm across

Stace[1] describes this plant as having the following characteristics:

  • Upright, to 50 cm; softly hairy, with hairs at more-or-less right-angles to the main stem.
  • Flowers grey-blue, to 8mm across, flat in profile; sepal tube with hooked hairs; April–July.[2]
  • Mature fruit dark brown, shiny.
  • Mature calyx on spreading stalks longer than sepal tube; calyx teeth spreading to expose the ripe fruit.
  • Basal leaves stalked, in a rosette; upper leaves not stalked.
  • Generally found in woods, scree and rock ledges; common throughout the British Isles.

Cultivation [edit]

Widely cultivated throughout the temperate world, it is particularly associated with spring bedding schemes involving other spring-flowering subjects, notably daffodils, tulips, wallflowers and primulas. It is also the parent of numerous cultivars in shades of pink, blue and white.[3]

Cultivars include:-

  • 'Blue Basket', a taller variety with deeper blue flowers
  • 'Blue Ball', a more compact variety
  • 'Music', erect and large flowered
  • 'Pompadour', compact, ball-shaped with large rose-pink flowers
  • 'Snowball', white flowers
  • 'Ultramarine', dwarf with very deep blue flowers
  • 'Victoria Rose', bright pink flowers

Notable Gardens [edit]

References [edit]

  1. ^ New Flora of the British Isles; Clive Stace; Third edition; 2011 printing
  2. ^ The Wild Flowers of Britain and Northern Europe; Fitter, Fitter, Blamey; Collins; 3rd edition 1978
  3. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
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Notes

Comments

A widespread and polymorphic species which according to Vestergren (Stroh in Arkiv. Bot. 29A(8): 1-39.1938) comprises several subspecies throughout its geographical range. Vestergren (in nota, l.c. 6) was of the view that the plants from the Himalayas were fairly distinct and represented a separate race, “Myosotis himalaica. ined.” More material of Myosotis sylvatica from the Himalayas is required for further studies, involving pollen morphology to verify this. Our plants come closest to subsp. rivularis Vestergren (found N. & NW. Iran) and are tentatively treated under this subhead. According to M. Popov (l.c. 373) typical Myosotis sylvatica is a forest plant with broader leaves and thin ± creeping rhizome.
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