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Overview

Comprehensive Description

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This is one of the blue-flowered Forget-Me-Not species (some others have white flowers). True Forget-Me-Not is a larger plant with larger leaves and larger flowers (6-8 mm. across) than the native Myosotis laxa (Small Forget-Me-Not), which has flowers about 3-4 mm. across. Another species that is sometimes cultivated, the non-native Myosotis sylvatica (Garden Forget-Me-Not), has a very similar appearance to True Forget-Me-Not. Garden Forget-Me-Not differs by having spreading hooked hairs on its calyx, and its calyx teeth are as long or longer than the calyx tube. Furthermore, its calyx teeth are more lanceolate and pointed than those of True Forget-Me-Not, which are more ovate and blunt.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Description

This perennial wildflower is 6-20" tall and either unbranched or branched. The central stem is medium green, terete, and hairy. The alternate leaves are 1-3" long and ¼-¾" across; they are oblong-elliptic or oblong-oblanceolate in shape, smooth along their margins, and sessile. The upper leaf surface is medium green and either hairless or sparsely covered with appressed hairs, while the lower surface is medium green and sparsely to moderately covered with hairs. Each leaf has a prominent central vein. The central stem (and any lateral stems) terminates in a raceme of flowers 2-10" long. The apex of this raceme curves laterally and slightly downward like a scorpion's tail. The central stalk of the raceme is medium green, terete, and covered with appressed hairs. The flowers occur on slender pedicels about ¼" long. Each flower is about 1/4-1/3" (6-8 mm.) across, consisting of a light blue corolla with 5 petal-like lobes, a short tubular calyx with 5 teeth, 5 stamens that are inserted within the corolla, and a pistil with a single style. The opening of the corolla is narrow and it is surrounded by a ring of yellow. The calyx is medium green and covered with appressed hairs; its teeth are shorter than the calyx tube and they are ovate in shape. The blooming period can occur from late spring to early fall. On each raceme, only a few flowers are in bloom at the same time. Each flower is replaced by 4 small nutlets that are shorter than the persistent style. The root system is shallow and fibrous. The base of a plant's stem is often creeping or stolon-like, where it can take root and produce clonal offsets. This often results in a colony of plants.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Distribution

Range and Habitat in Illinois

True Forget-Me-Not rarely naturalizes in the Illinois, where it is found primarily in the NE section of the state. It was introduced into North America from Eurasia as an ornamental garden plant. While True Forget-Me-Not has not been invasive in Illinois thus far, it has become aggressive in some areas of northeastern United States. Habitats consist of low areas along springs, ponds, and slow-moving streams where the supply of moisture is more or less stable.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

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Distribution: Temperate Eurasia & N. America.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

The species is similar to Myosotis caespitosa, but differs in the style equalling the calyx, calyx 1/3rd divided into acute lobes and corolla limb 5-7 mm broad.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

True Forget-Me-Not rarely naturalizes in the Illinois, where it is found primarily in the NE section of the state. It was introduced into North America from Eurasia as an ornamental garden plant. While True Forget-Me-Not has not been invasive in Illinois thus far, it has become aggressive in some areas of northeastern United States. Habitats consist of low areas along springs, ponds, and slow-moving streams where the supply of moisture is more or less stable.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Associations

Faunal Associations

According to Müller (1873/1883) in Germany, the flowers of True Forget-Me-Not attract small butterflies and dance flies (Empis spp.); these insects feed on the nectar. Two polyphagous aphids, Myzus persicae and Rhopalosiphum padi, have been observed to suck plant juices from Myosotis spp. (Forget-Me-Not species) in Illinois (Hottes & Frison, 1931). When this wildflower forms colonies of plants along wetlands, it provides cover for snakes and small animals.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Foodplant / sap sucker
nymph of Dictyla convergens sucks sap of Myosotis scorpioides

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
immersed sorus of Entyloma fergussonii causes spots on live Myosotis scorpioides
Remarks: season: 5-7

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Melisandra cinereipes grazes on leaf of Myosotis scorpioides
Other: sole host/prey

Foodplant / parasite
oospore of Peronospora myosotidis parasitises live Myosotis scorpioides

Plant / resting place / within
puparium of Phytomyza myosotica may be found in leaf-mine of Myosotis scorpioides
Other: major host/prey

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per.: April-May.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Myosotis scorpioides

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Myosotis scorpioides

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full or partial sun and wet to moist conditions. This wildflower adapts to ordinary garden soil containing loam or clay-loam if it is kept sufficiently moist. Shallow standing water is tolerated.
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© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Wikipedia

Myosotis scorpioides

Myosotis scorpioides (syn. Myosotis palustris), the Water Forget-me-not or True Forget-me-not, is a herbaceous perennial plant of the genus Myosotis. It is native to Europe and Asia, but can be found elsewhere, including much of North America, as an introduced species and sometimes a noxious weed. It grows in bogs and wet places and beside streams and rivers. It is an erect plant which ranges in height from 6 in. to two feet, bearing small (1/4 in.) blue flowers with yellow centers. It blooms from mid-spring to first frost in temperate climates.

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Notes

Comments

Found from 2200-2500 m.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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