Overview

Comprehensive Description

Black Mangrove (Avicennia germinans) has a broad tropical distribution. Avicennia includes about 15 species, mostly restricted to coastal tidal regions in the tropics (Elias 1980). Tree and shrub species are described as mangroves based on their ecology rather than evolutionary relatedness, so mangrove species represent numerous plant families.

Black Mangrove groves are virtually impenetrable because of the dense branches. The trees produce numerous upright, unbranched roots (pneumatophores) above water and around the edges of the trees to provide the extensive root system with air. These pneumatophores also trap detritus brought in by the tides. (Elias 1980)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Mangrove swamps dominate much of the world's tropical and sub-tropical coastlines, and have a similar distribution pattern as coral reefs. There are approximately 35 species of true mangroves and another 60 or more species of mangrove associates. Most species occur throughout the Indo-Pacific region, with 3 commonly occurring in the Americas.Avicennia germinans, the black mangrove, is a tropical/subtropical tree which colonizes coastal areas from the equator to 28 degrees north and south. Avicennia germinans along with Laguncularia racemosa (the white mangrove), are generally found at slightly higher tidal elevations than Rhizophora mangle, the red mangrove, which colonizes the intertidal zone.Avicennia germinans is characterized by its opposite leaves which are narrow and elliptical in shape; often found encrusted with salt. Propagules are small (2-3 cm in diameter) and bean-like, flattened in shape. The root system of Avicennia germinans consists of long underground cable roots which produce hundreds of thin, upright pneumatophores on the ground around the tree. These structures have numerous pores which are thought to conduct oxygen to the underground portion of the root system.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

General: Black mangrove is a subtropical native woody shrub that grows in salt marshes. Mangroves are very hardy, having become adapted to harsh environments where water and salinity levels fluctuate. Pneumatophores, or breather roots, form a network, collecting silt and debris and controlling erosion.

The pneumatophores are also excellent nursery areas for crustaceans in the marsh plant community. Height will vary from 4 to 9 feet. Leaves are 1 to 5 inches long, elliptical, opposite, thick, leathery, dark green, glabrous (smooth) above, and grayish with a tight felt-like pubescence beneath. Glands on the underside secrete salt. Clusters of small sessile flowers with white petals, approximately ½ inch in diameter, are borne in the leaf axils or growing tips on the twigs. The fruit are flat, approximately 1 inch long, dark green and glabrous beneath a velvety pericarp. The bark on the black mangrove is thick, dark brown or blackish, with rough irregular flattened scales. Twigs are grayish in color and smooth, with enlargements at the joints. Mangrove detritus (dead leaves and twigs) in water feeds microorganisms that provide food for young marine life.

Distribution: For current distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.

Habitat: Black mangrove grows in the intertidal zone throughout the Gulf of Mexico. Black mangrove is a truly unique plant species that, when established properly, and under applicable conditions, has provided land stabilization due to the easy transport of seedlings, quick aerial root production, Best practice has been to plant two to three year old seedlings because underground root systems increase sediment holding capabilities. This plant also provides for wildlife and marine habitats. (USDA/NRCS Plant Guide: Small, J.K 1933.)

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Alternative names

None in common usage

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Avicennia germinans, commonly known as the black mangrove, is found in tropical and subtropical mangrove forests ranging from the southeastern United States in North America to Brazil in South America. It is found along both coasts of Central America, as well as West Africa and Australia (Kathiresan and Bingham 2001). They flourish in brackish waters, where tidal ocean saltwater mixes with freshwater from streams, and thus must be able to withstand a wide range of salinities (Suarez et al. 1998). A. germinans is a shrub or tree that can reach up to 20 m tall and is characterized by distinct root structures known as pneumatophores (Zuchowski 2007). The trunk is straight and the grey bark is generally fissured. The simple opposite leaves are long and narrow, often shiny green and leathery, and have short petioles (Condit et al. 2011).

Like all mangroves, A. germinans is adapted to deal with high salt environments in muddy, anaerobic soils. A. germinans has a very large salt tolerance, ranging from freshwater to water with three times the salinity of seawater (Sobrado 1999). This reflects the ability of this tree to grow in saltwater basins that frequently exhibit salinity higher than that of seawater (Saenger 2002). A. germinans is able to withstand these intense salinity levels through the ability to excrete salt through glands on the surface of the leaves, increasing the salt tolerance of the plant (Griffiths 2008).

Thin, pencil-like pneumatophores emerge from the thick mud substrate in which the tree is found, an adaption that allows A. germinans to colonize anaerobic substrates (Thibodeau and Nickerson 1986). These root structures aid in gas exchange when they are exposed to the air, a mechanism that allows this tree to flourish even though the substrate conditions fail to provide the tree with necessary oxygen (Tomlinson 1994). The pneumatophores are connected to a horizontal root system that allows the tree to send roots wide in search of nutrients and oxygen, but not deep into the anaerobic soil (Zuchowski 2007).

Small insects and bees are thought to pollinate A. germinans (Landry 2013). Water remains the key dispersal mechanism. A. germinans seedlings are equipped for this dispersal method due to their buoyancy, high salinity tolerance, and cryptoviviparous nature (Alleman and Hester 2011). Propagules germinate on the mother tree and the seedling pierces the seed coat but not the pericarp, allowing the germinated seedling to experience maximum nutrient acquisition while still maintaining the ability to withstand long dispersal times in saltwater (Das and Ghose 2003).

Conservation of A. germinans remains an important and contested issue in many areas. As shorelines are being developed more and more mangrove forests are being cut down (Valiela et al 2001). These mangrove forests are not only important homes for wildlife, but also help to reduce erosion of shoreline in tidal salt marshes and maintain barrier islands, which are an important natural protection from tropical storms. The pneumatophores help to trap organic matter and sediment, and can actually be used to rebuild shorelines and restore wetland habitats (United States Department of Agriculture 2005).

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Black Mangrove (Avicennia germinans) is very widely distributed along tropical silty seashores of Bermuda; throughout most of the West Indies; in the southeastern U.S. along both coasts of northern Florida to the Florida Keys, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas; along both coasts of Mexico south along Central America to Ecuador, northwestern Peru, the Galapagos Islands, and Brazil; and along the west coast of Africa. (Little and Wadsworth 1964)

The Black Mangrove (A. germinans) is distributed along the tropical and subtropical coasts of the American continent, the Caribbean islands, and West Africa. Three geographical units can be defined, including east Pacific (American Pacific), west Atlantic (American Atlantic and Caribbean), and east Atlantic (West Africa) (Nettel and Dodd 2007)

Avicennia germinans is a widespread mangrove species occupying the west coast of Africa and the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the Americas from the Bahamas to Brazil and Baja California to Peru (Dodd et al. 2002).

Black Mangrove reaches its northern limit in the northern hemisphere in Florida, Louisiana, and Texas, where in recent decades it has been moving northward into temperate salt marshes typically dominated by the salt marsh grass Spartina alterniflora. In Louisiana marshes, Black Mangroves were historically restricted to the southernmost barrier islands and beaches by winter freeze events. However, in recent years freeze-free winters have facilitated a noticeable expansion of Black Mangrove northward into Spartina marshes. Nearly two decades of warm winter temperatures in coastal Louisiana have facilitated this northward expansion. (Perry and Mendelssohn 2009)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 4.0 of 5

Range Description

This species is probably the most widespread neotropical mangrove. It is reported from the eastern tropical coasts of North and South America ranging from southern Florida and Bermuda, 32°20' to Atafona, Brazil, 21°37' and all Caribbean Islands (status on Anguilla is unknown).

It has been noted in a discontinuous distribution on the Pacific coast of South America from Puerto Lobos, Mexico (30°15') south to Piura River, Peru (5°32') (de Lacerda 2002) including the Galapagos Islands, Cocos and Malpelo Islands.

It is also noted from West Africa (Angola, Benin and Togo, Cameroon, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bisau, Liberia, Mauritania, Nigeria, Sao Tomé and Principe, Senegal, and Sierra Leone.

The distribution of this species in Brazil is somewhat in question as the species may be mis-identified as A. germinans when in fact it is A. schaueriana (Tomlinson 1995).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: Found in Florida, Texas, Bahamas, Antilles, Galapagos, Mexico, Panama, Peru, other parts of Central America and other parts of South America. Occurs in Panamanian provinces of Bocas del Toro, Canal Area, Cocle, Colon, Los Santos, Panama and San Blas (D'arcy 1987).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Avicennia germinans occurs worldwide in coastal and estuarine areas of the tropics and subtropics to about 28 degrees in both the northern and southern hemispheres. In the Indian River Lagoon, it is a common landscape feature to approximately 28 degrees North, around the vicinity of Merritt Island, Florida. North of this location, there is a transition zone where mangrove forests gradually give way to salt marshes. Frost stress north of the transition zone prevents mangroves from becoming well established.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Adaptation

Black Mangrove adaptation is in the sub-tropical to tropical Gulf of Mexico in intertidal zones.

This plant is susceptible to freezing and the native range can be changed drastically by hard winters. The contributions of genetic diversity and habitat are presently under study to determine cold hardiness.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Black Mangrove has opposite, oblong to elliptical, evergreen leaves, 5 to 12 cm long and 2 to 4 cm wide, with smooth, slightly curled margins; the leaves are hairy below. The upper leaf surface is yellow-green and often shiny, the lower surface gray-green, often with scattered salt crystals apparent on both surfaces. The small 4-lobed white flowers, about 0.5 cm long and 1 cm across, are borne in terminal clusters up to 4 cm long. The fruit is a compressed (flattened) 2-valved and 1-seeded capsule 3 to 5 cm long that is yellow-green and finely hairy, with unequal sides. The bark of larger trees is dark reddish brown and scaly, with orange-red inner bark sometimes exposed between the scales. (Little and Wadsworth 1964; Brockman 1968; Elias 1980)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Little is known regarding typical age to maturation in mangroves in south Florida, though it has been hypothesized that maturation age for mangroves in south Florida is in some way linked to the periodicity of hurricanes.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

In Florida and the adjacent Gulf Coast, Black Mangrove reaches about 10 meters, but in much of its broad range it may grow to more than twice this height (Brockman 1968; Elias 1980).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Look Alikes

Lookalikes

An excellent resource for identifying the mangroves of Florida can be found at http://www.selby.org/

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species typically grows in the intertidal regions of sheltered tropical and subtropical coasts (Saenger 2002) and dominates the zone proximal to open water (McKee 1995). It tends to be found in the mid to high intertidal region, and is infrequently found at the seaward margin (Ellison and Farnsworth 1993, Tomlinson 1994, Sherman et al. 2001). Seedlings are quite tolerant of salinity (up to 900 mol/m3; Suarez and Medina 2005), expecially compared to other neotropical mangroves, and can occupy hypersaline areas (Cardona-Alarte et al. 2006). However, mortality increases and relative growth rate decreases at high salinity values (Suarez and Medina 2005).

Where it occurs, Avicennia often achieves the highest importance values and basal area (Murray et al. 2003), becoming the dominant species in the stand. Avicennia has the broadest temperature tolerance of all neotropical mangroves; however, freezing events have damaged extensive stands (Everitt et al. 1996); some recovery is possible. Avicennia responds negatively to drought (Sobrado 1999). Growth and survival of Avicennia germinans is also reduced when it competes with Spartina alterniflora (the dominant grass at the mangrove-salt marsh interface at the northern edge of the mangrove's range; Patterson et al. 1993).

Avicennia germinans provides critical habitat for several organisms, including crabs (Uca rapax, Sesarma curacoaoense, Aratus pisonii; Warner 1969). 104 species of birds are associated with Avicennia stands in Panama, with significant divergence among stands (Lefebvre and Poulin 1997); nesting habitat for Florida Prairie Warblers and Cuban Yellow Warblers (Prather and Cruz 1995).

Avicennia is important for pollinators; regarded as a source of honey for local Apis mellifera populations (Little and Wadsworth 1964).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Marine
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth range based on 6 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 1
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Dispersal

Establishment

Black mangrove establishes in nature from seed that floats and can travel some distance on the tides. Seed will germinate quickly to anchor young seedlings in good habitat.

In the nursery, seed collected in the wild will not survive more than three to four weeks. Seed should be soaked in water, the pericarp removed and the seed planted in any commercial potting soil Germination normally occurs within a couple of weeks and seedlings take root.

Recalcitrant seed on left, pericarp removed on right

Garret Thomassie, USDA NRCS Golden Meadow PMC

Our experience indicates that a normal variety of commercially available pots will suffice for germination and early growth. Plants can be maintained in fresh water tanks that hold moisture at the bottom of the pots.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

Mangrove forests typically show a wide range of productivity, depending on factors such as hydrological regimes, nutrient supply, etc., and are considered to be vital sources of organic matter for estuarine systems.Competitors: Ball (1980) suggested that competition among the 3 mangrove species may be partially responsible for the zonation observed in many mangrove areas. Direct consumers of mangrove propagules in Florida include the spotted mangrove crab (Goniosis cruentata), the mangrove land crab (Ucides cordatus), the coffee bean snail (Malapus coffeus) and the ladder horn snail (Cerithidea scalariformis). Consumers of mangrove leaves include the mangrove crab (Aratus pisonii), the spotted mangrove crab (G. cruentata), the blue land crab (Cardisoma guanhumi), and various types of insects. Wood boring isopods feed upon and damage prop roots.Habitat: Propagules of A. germinans may float for an indefinite period without taking root. They generally take root upon coming to rest on a suitable substrate area consisting of sand, silt, mud or clay which offers some protection from waves. Propagules may root even while completely submerged; and mature trees, depending on type, tend not to be sensitive to hydroperiod; they may remain submerged anywhere from several hours to nearly permanently without showing adverse effects.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Mangroves form intertidal forests in which red mangrove prop roots, black mangrove pneumatophores, and their associated peat banks serve as the dominant substrata for other members of the mangrove community. Black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) and white mangroves (Laguncularia racemosa) are usually found in association with red mangroves. Segregation of the 3 species does occur, however; with red mangroves typically occupying the lowest intertidal position. Black and white mangroves occur at slightly higher tidal elevations.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

The seedlings of Black Mangrove are often subject to heavy predation by various species of mangrove crabs (McKee 1995; Lindquist et al. 2009 and references therein).

Gilbert and Sousa (2002) studied the host-associations of wood-decaying basidiomycete polypore fungi on three mangrove species (Rhizophora mangle, Avicennia germinans, and Laguncularia racemosa) in a Panamanian mangrove forest. They note that the pattern typically observed for these fungi in diverse tropical forests is that there are a large number of rare species, with the smaller number of common species necessarily being nonspecialists due to the challenge of host rarity. In contrast, the authors found that in the tropical mangrove forest they studied, the polypore assemblage was strongly dominated by a few host-specialized species. Three fungal species, each with a strong preference for a different mangrove host species, comprised 88 percent of all fungi collected (the authors note, however, that these fungi are all reported from other hosts outside of mangrove forests as well). At least for polypore fungi within tropical mangrove forests, where host diversity is low and the abundance of individual host species is high, the restriction against host specialization typically imposed by host rarity in tropical forests may be relaxed, resulting in a polypore community dominated by a few common host-specialist species. (Gilbert and Sousa 2002)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

The black mangrove is considered abundant to common in the Indian River Lagoon, as well as throughout much of its range.Locomotion: Propagules of the black mangrove detach from the parent tree upon ripening and may float in salt water for approximately one year without rooting.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Ecology

Ecology

Ecologically, tropical mangrove swamp forests share many similarities with salt marshes to the north (although mangroves are woody and salt marshes are generally dominated by grasses and other herbaceous vegetation). Both mangrove swamps and salt marshes occur at the interface of land and sea, protect the coast from storm damage (especially hurricanes), and serve as important nurseries for fish and invertebrates. Mangrove leaves are an important source of energy for marine food webs: fallen leaves are colonized by bacteria, fungi, and protozoans, which are in turn fed upon by zooplankton, which in turn are consumed by juvenile fish and larval invertebrates. (Kricher 1988)

In southern Florida and the Caribbean, Black Mangrove forms dense thickets just inshore of Red Mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) (Brockman 1968). In one of the best studied mangrove regions, the Caribbean, Rhizophora mangle typically grows in a pure stand at the seaward forest edge. About 10 to 20 m from the water's edge, Laguncularia racemosa (White Mangrove) joins the canopy, forming a nearly even mixture with Rhizophora in the low intertidal. Avicennia germinans enters the canopy in the mid-intertidal, creating a mixed canopy of the three species, and it then gradually monopolizes most upper intertidal stands. Laguncularia often reappears in the canopy near the upland edge, growing as scattered individuals or small monospecific stands along the mangrove– forest ecotone. Although at one time this spatial distribution of the different mangrove species was presumed to be attributable to spatial gradients in factors such as salinity, a variety of experimental and other data have indicated that differences among species in their tolerance of different environmental conditions is insufficient to explain the observed zonation. (Sousa et al. 2007 and references therein)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

It is widely believed that the flowers of Avicennia germinans are pollinated by insects, principally bees. Black mangroves exhibit cryptovivipary, in which the embryo emerges from the seed coat, but remains in the fruit before abscission from the parent plant occurs. The seedlings, or propagules, eventually fall from the parent plant and are able, in the absence of suitable substrata, to float for an indefinite period in salt water without rooting.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Black Mangrove seeds often germinate and split open the fruit while still on the parent tree (Elias 1980).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Phylogeography

Genetic studies of Black Mangrove have revealed closer similarities between populations of Atlantic South America and those of the east Atlantic (West Africa) than between Atlantic South America and Atlantic North America (Dodd et al. 2000). Levels of genetic diversity vary considerably among populations, but are generally higher in populations from the east Atlantic. Regional differentiation between the Pacific coast and Atlantic populations is greater than between east and west Atlantic populations, suggesting that the Central American Isthmus has had an important influence on population genetic structure in this species. The lower level of divergence of east Atlantic from west Atlantic populations and results from detailed genetic analyses are consistent with dispersal of propagules across the Atlantic Ocean during the Quaternary (Dodd et al. 2002; Nettel and Dodd 2007).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physiology and Cell Biology

Physiology

Gilbert et al. (2002) studied the possible role of salt excretion by mangroves as a defense against pathogenic fungi in a mangrove forest in Panama. Although presumably evolved for other reasons, salt excretion by leaves of some mangrove species may serve as an important defense against fungal attack, reducing the vulnerability of typically high-density, monospecific forest stands to severe disease pressure. In their study, Gilbert et al. found that Black Mangrove (Avicennia germinans) suffered much less fungal leaf damage from than did White Mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa) or Red Mangrove (Rhizophora mangle). Black Mangrove leaves also supported the least fungal growth on the leaf surface, the least endophytic colonization, and the lowest fungal diversity, followed by White Mangrove and Red Mangrove.

Host specificity of leaf-colonizing fungi was greater than expected at random. The fungal assemblage found on Black Mangrove appears to be a subset of the fungi that can grow on the leaves of Red and White Mangrove. The authors suggested that the different salt tolerance mechanisms in the three mangrove species may differentially regulate fungal colonization. The mangroves differ in their salt tolerance mechanisms such that Black Mangrove (which excretes salt through leaf glands) has the highest salinity of residual rain water on leaves, White Mangrove (which accumulates salt in the leaves) has the greatest bulk salt concentration, and Red Mangrove (which excludes salt at the roots) has little salt associated with leaves. The high salt concentrations associated with leaves of Black and White Mangrove, but not the low salinity of Red Mangrove, were sufficient to inhibit the germination of many fungi associated with mangrove forests. The authors suggest that efficient defenses against pathogens may be especially important in natural communities, such as mangrove forests, where host diversity is low and the density of individual hosts is high – ideal conditions for diseases to have strong impacts on plant populations.

Mangrove forests are unusual among tropical forests for their low tree species diversity and associated high population density of individual species. Mangrove species are unusual in their ability to grow in flooded, saline soils and for the array of mechanisms they have evolved to tolerate high salt concentrations. The work by Gilbert et al. suggests that some mangrove species may also be unusual in their escape from strong disease pressures, even when growing at high densities, through the inhibitory effects of high foliar (leaf) salt concentration on fungal infection. (Gilbert et al. 2002)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Chemistry

Wood contains the naphthoquinone lepachol.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data: Avicennia germinans

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Avicennia germinans

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 15
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Ellison, A., Farnsworth, E. & Moore, G.

Reviewer/s
Polidoro, B.A., Livingstone, S.R. & Carpenter, K.E. (Global Marine Species Assessment Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Although black mangroves are threatened by habitat conversion, pollution, hurricanes and other threats, which have resulted in declines throughout the wider Caribbean region, total mangrove habitat loss within this species range over the last 25 years is estimated to be 17%. It is listed as Least Concern. However, this species should be carefully monitored, as it is difficult to restore and rates of decline maybe be increasing in some areas.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Found in Florida, Texas, Bahamas, Antilles, Galapagos, Mexico, Panama, Peru, other parts of Central America and other parts of South America. Occurs in Panamanian provinces of Bocas del Toro, Canal Area, Cocle, Colon, Los Santos, Panama and San Blas (D'arcy 1987). Regarded as a timber species (Alvarez 1991).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Status

This species is native to the Gulf of Mexico and has not been identified as invasive or detrimental to the environment. Black mangrove is a native and valuable component of the marsh ecosystem.

Please consult the PLANTS website and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status (e.g. threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values)

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
Genetic studies of Avicennia are numerous as microsatellite loci, RAPDs, and AFLPs have been developed for this species (Ceron-Souza et al. 2006). Eastern and western Atlantic provenances of Avicennia show significant genetic differentiation, as indicated by leaf chemistry (Dodd and Bousquet-Melou 2000). Studies to date show well-defined genetic structure differentiating western Atlantic from Pacific populations across the isthmus of Panama (Dodd et al. 2002) and among populations sharing a coastline (Ceron-Souza et al. 2005).

Population information for this species in a number of areas:

Mouth of Lostman's River in Everglades National Park, Florida, U.S. 209 individuals counted over 6 transects totaling 0.26 ha (McCoy et al. 1996). Cockroach Bay (part of Tampa Bay, Florida, U.S.) contains 537 hectares of mangroves and 120 trees per ha (Dawes et al. 1999) of this species were recorded. In Laguna de Celestun, Yucatan, Mexico, combined data for A. germinans, R. mangle and L. racemosa basal area ranges from 21 square meters/ha to 36 square meters/ha (Herrera-Silveira and Ramirez-Ramirez 1998). In Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles: 0.50 tree/square meter (De Meyer, 1998). Parque Nacional Morrocoy, Venezuela: 68% R. mangle, 29% L. racemosa, 8% A. germinans, 1% unidentified total tree density 348 trees/0.1 ha (Bone et al. 1998).

In Cartagena and Barbacoas Bays (Calderón-Sáenz 1984) and Port Royal mangal, this species grows in a mixed zone of R. mangle, A. germinans and L. racemosa that is bordered by a dense monospecific stand of R. mangle and a monospecific stand of C. erectus. (Alleng 1998). In Bahía Las Minas on the Caribbean coast of Panama, there are 1,200 ha of mangroves, which is about 0.3% of the total mangroves in Panama (Duke et al. 1997). This species can dominate sites further inland in Belize where the soil salinity increased through evaporation (Murray et al. 2003).

Population Trend
Decreasing
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
Black mangroves are threatened by habitat conversion, pollution, hurricanes and other threats, which have resulted in declines throughout the wider Caribbean region. Although local estimates are uncertain due to differing legislative definitions of what is a 'mangrove' and to the imprecision in determining mangrove area, current consensus estimates of mangrove loss in the last quarter-century report an approximately 17% decline in mangrove areas in countries within this species range since 1980 (FAO 2007).

All mangrove ecosystems occur within mean sea level and high tidal elevations, and have distinct species zonations that are controlled by the elevation of the substrate relative to mean sea level. This is because of associated variation in frequency of elevation, salinity and wave action (Duke et al. 1998). With rise in sea-level, the habitat requirements of each species will be disrupted, and species zones will suffer mortality at their present locations and re-establish at higher elevations in areas that were previously landward zones (Ellison 2005). If sea-level rise is a continued trend over this century, then there will be continued mortality and re-establishment of species zones. However, species that are easily dispersed and fast growing/fast producing will cope better than those which are slower growing and slower to reproduce.

In addition, mangrove area is declining globally due to a number of localized threats. The main threat is habitat destruction and removal of mangrove areas. Reasons for removal include cleared for shrimp farms, agriculture, fish ponds, rice production and salt pans, and for the development of urban and industrial areas, road construction, coconut plantations, ports, airports, and tourist resorts. Other threats include pollution from sewage effluents, solid wastes, siltation, oil, and agricultural and urban runoff. Climate change is also thought to be a threat, particularly at the edges of a species range. Natural threats include cyclones, hurricane and tsunamis.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments: Regarded as a timber species (Alvarez 1991).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Pests and potential problems

There are no known pests that could threaten black mangrove stands in the wild.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no conservation measures specific to this species, but its range may include some marine and coastal protected areas. Continued monitoring and research is recommended, as well as the inclusion of mangrove areas in marine and coastal protected areas.

For Avicenna germinans, mangrove tree planting and silviculture can be used to restore previously stripped areas or to help timber production and to create and protect reserves (Saenger 2002). Restoration of Avicennia is being pursued in Louisiana (Willis et al. 2005), Florida (Milano 1999, McKee and Faulkner 2000, Milbrandt and Tinsley 2006), Mexico (Toledo et al. 2001), Costa Rica (Lewis and Marshall 1998) and Colombia (Elster 2000). See the general review by Lewis (2005) for further information. Effectiveness of habitat restoration and success of replantings with A. germinans needs to be assessed; it may be the most promising species for afforesting hypersaline areas.Most seedlings die during natural recruitment events and restoration is challenging.

Demographic modeling could also be useful to establish a minimum viable population size for A. germinans. Evidence from Florida suggests that invasive species negatively impacts A. germinans, more research is recomended. The studies of the uses and cost/benefit analysis are needed for more areas along Atlantic and Caribbean shores and impacts of harvesting on populations. Expand GIS mapping and remote sensing projects and utilize new Landsat and IKONOS technology to do species-based, landscape-level monitoring of deforestation (Kovacs et al. 2005).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Cultivars, improved and selected materials (and area of origin)

The USDA NRCS Plant Materials Centers have released one variety: Pelican Germplasm black mangrove is a pre-varietal release from the Golden Meadow Plant Materials Center, Galliano, Louisiana, selected to provide a plant for soil conservation in brackish and salt water marshes.

Contact your local Natural Resources Conservation Service office for more information. Look in the phone book under “United States Government”. The Natural Resources Conservation Service will be listed under the subheading “Department of Agriculture.”

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Seed production

Experience at the NRCS-Golden Meadow Plant Materials Center has shown that seed collected in the Fall (October to early December in South Louisiana) can be maintained for about a month, but should be planted as soon as possible after soaking removing the pericarp. There is work presently being conducted on maintaining seed for delayed germination, but at present, seed should have the pericarp removed and planted as soon as possible. Seed may be held longer with aeration (Personal communication Mat Benoit).

Two year old seedlings or older (18 inches tall) seem to be best for successful out planting. Various sizes of tubes and pots have been used with success. The greater the root mass (not pot bound) the greater the chance of successful out planting.

Planting where the tidal flow will cover and uncover the root collar is best. Soil types can vary from muck soils to areas that have some sand.

Interior marsh planting

Garret Thomassie, USDA NRCS Golden Meadow PMC

New plantings in areas of high wave energy may have to be protected by baffles or anchoring the seedlings in place until the root system is capable of supporting the plant.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Environmental concerns

Black mangrove has persisted in the intertidal marsh and is a valuable component of the ecosystem. Loss of black mangrove is a concern as it is a woody species that persists and assists in habitat development and in breaking wave energy and adds nesting habitat for birds including the pelican.

Care must be taken to planting as black mangrove is very susceptible to freezing. More work needs to be done in collecting ecotypes that might be more frost resistant, or attention to habitat differences.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

There are no data on managing native black mangrove stands. In the Gulf of Mexico the range of black mangrove is “managed” by the winter weather.

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Root: Aphrodisiac. Stem and Leaf: The French Guiana Palikur mix stem and leaf with a smaller amount of Rhabdadenia biflora and Nicotiana tabacum in a soothing remedy for stingray wounds.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Economic Uses

Uses: Building materials/timber

Comments: The trunks are used for ship masts (Brucher 1989).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Mangrove communities support populations of invertebrates, birds and juvenile fishes. Birds utilize mangrove areas as important nesting habitat, while many species of commercially or recreationally important fish species utilize mangrove habitat as nursery grounds while juveniles. Benefit in the IRL:Mangrove forest ecosystems are vital as sources of energy and provide nursery habitat for juvenile fish and invertebrates. They also provide roosting and nesting habitat for wading birds. In addition, mangrove communities provide a source for timber production and are important as buffers in decreasing storm impacts along coastlines.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Uses

The fragrant white flowers of Black Mangrove are rich in nectar and honeybees make excellent honey from them (Elias 1980; Petrides 1988).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Uses

Black mangrove is valuable in soil conservation in brackish and salt water marshes. It serves as nursery habitat for crustaceans and fish, and filters sediment for building new marsh. Black mangrove also mixes well with other native plants to reduce wave energy

Public Domain

USDA NRCS Plant Materials Center

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Avicennia germinans

The black mangrove (Avicennia germinans), is a species of flowering plant in the acanthus family, Acanthaceae.[2] It grows in tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas, on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, and on the Atlantic coast of tropical Africa, where it thrives on the sandy and muddy shores that seawater reaches. It is common throughout coastal areas of Texas and Florida, and ranges as far north as southern Louisiana and coastal Georgia in the United States.

Like many other mangrove species, it reproduces by vivipary. Seeds are encased in a fruit, which reveals the germinated seedling when it falls into the water.

Unlike other mangrove species, it does not grow on prop roots, but possesses pneumatophores that allow its roots to breathe even when submerged. It is a hardy species and expels absorbed salt mainly from its leathery leaves.

The name "black mangrove" refers to the color of the trunk and heartwood. The leaves often appear whitish from the salt excreted at night and on cloudy days. It is often found in its native range with the red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) and the white mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa). White mangroves grow inland from black mangroves which themselves grow inland from red mangroves. The three species work together to stabilize the shoreline, provide buffers from storm surges, trap debris and detritus brought in by tides, and provide feeding, breeding, and nursery grounds for a great variety of fish, shellfish, birds, and other wildlife.

Habitat[edit]

A black mangrove tree growing in shallow water in Everglades National Park
Black mangrove flowers

The black mangrove grows just above the high tide in coastal lagoons and brackish water estuaries. It is less tolerant of highly saline conditions than certain other species that occur in mangrove ecosystems.[3] It can reach 10–15 m (33–49 ft) in height, although it is a small shrub in cooler regions of its range. The seeds germinate in midsummer, but may be seen all year on the trees. The seeds can remain viable for over a year once released.

Wood[edit]

The heartwood is dark-brown to black, while the sapwood is yellow-brown. It has the unusual property of having less dense heartwood than sapwood. The sapwood sinks in water while the heartwood floats. The wood is strong, heavy, and hard, but is difficult to work due to its interlocked grain and is somewhat difficult to finish due to its oily texture. Uses include posts, pilings, charcoal, and fuel. Despite growing in a marine environment, the dry wood is subject to attack by marine borers and termites. Like many species, it contains tannin in the bark and has been used to tan leather products.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Avicennia germinans (L.) L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 1999-07-12. Retrieved 2010-05-20. 
  2. ^ "Avicennia germinans_EOL". 
  3. ^ World Wildlife Fund. 2010. Petenes mangroves. eds. Mark McGinley, C.Michael Hogan & C. Cleveland. Encyclopedia of Earth. National Council for Science and the Environment. Washington DC

Further reading[edit]

  • Haehle, Robert (1999). Native Florida Plants. Houston: Gulf Publishing Company. ISBN 0-88415-425-4. 
  • McKee, Karen L., Irving A. Mendelssohn, and Mark W. Hester. "Reexamination of pore water sulfide concentrations and redox potentials near the aerial roots of Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans." American Journal of Botany (1988): 1352-1359.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Common Names

FG Creole: black mangrove, paletuvier blanc. FG Palikur: payuyri. Guyana: courida. Guyana Arawak: koroda. Guyana Carib: apario. Surinam: apalioe, koroda, parwa.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!