Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Extreme southeastern Virginia to south-central Florida, west to southwestern Georgia and adjacent parts of the Florida panhandle (Cantino, 1982).

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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Physostegia leptophylla is distinguished from P. longisepala by calyx lobes rarely over 2.5 mm long, infrequently cuspidate; longest trichomes on raceme axis 0.1-0.13 mm long; lower stem leaves elliptical to lanceolate (rarely oblanceolate); leaves bluntly toothed, repand, or entire (rarely sharply serrate). P. leptophylla is distinguished from P. intermedia (which occupies swamp and marsh habitats in the Mississippi Valley and westward) by uppermost leaves infrequently widest at base of blade; flowering calyx tube 3.5-6 mm long; base of plant rarely conspicuously swollen; length divided by width of fruiting calyx tube 0.8 to 1.5, rarely 2.

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Type Information

Isotype for Physostegia leptophylla Small
Catalog Number: US 1322208
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. P. Garber
Locality: Manatee River., Manatee, Florida, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Small, J. K. 1899. Bull. New York Bot. Gard. 1: 286.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Wooded river swamps, fresh and brackish marshes, wet muck or peat, commonly in shallow water, edges of rivers and streams.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: PERENNIAL

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Reproduction

The family is primarily bee pollinated (Proctor & Yeo, 1973, p. 219).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Threats

Comments: Threatened primarily by real estate development along streams and by conversion of habitat to slash pine plantations.

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