Overview

Distribution

Cultivation

In the second half of the 16th century, D. moldavica was introduced to Europe and cultivated as ornamental, spice, medicinal and bee plant [1, 2]

In Mexico D. moldavica is systematically cultivated. [3]

  • [1] Mansfeld's Encyclopedia of Agricultural and Horticultural Crops, Springer, 2001
  • [2] Handbuch des Arznei- und Gewürzpflanzenbaus, Verein für Arznei- und Gewürzpflanzen Saluplanta e.V. Bernburg, Band 4, 2011, ISBN 978-3-935971-62-1
  • [3] Vázquez et al., Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 141 (2012) 908–917
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Dracocephalum moldavica L.:
Afghanistan (Asia)
India (Asia)
Russian Federation (Asia)
Tajikistan (Asia)
Turkmenistan (Asia)
United States (North America)
South Africa (Africa & Madagascar)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shanxi [India, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan; Europe]
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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs annual. Stems numerous, (6-)22-40 cm, erect or ascending, minutely retrorse hairy, purplish. Basal cauline leaves withering early; petiole as long as blade, shorter upward; leaf blade ovate-triangular, base cordate, margin remotely crenate, apex rounded; upper blades lanceolate to linear-lanceolate, 1.4-4 × 0.4-1.2 cm, yellow glandular, veins sparsely minute hairy, base rounded to broadly cuneate, margin triangular-dentate or sparsely serrate, with basal teeth sometimes lobelike, apex long spiny, obtuse. Verticillasters 4-flowered, loose, in 5-12 upper nodes of stems and branches; bracts oblong, shorter to slightly longer than calyx, margin 2- or 3-spinescent-denticulate, with spines 2.5-3.5 mm, sparsely appressed hairy. Pedicel 3-5 mm, horizontal after anthesis. Calyx 8-10 mm, golden glandular, pubescent especially basally, purple veined, 2-lipped to 1/2 its length; upper lip teeth divisions 1/4-1/3 of lip, teeth subequal, triangular-ovate, apex acute. Corolla bluish purple, 1.5-2.5 (-3) cm, dilated beyond throat, white pubescent outside; upper lip short navicular, ca. 1/4 as long as tube; middle lobe of lower lip dark purple spotted. Nutlets oblong, ca. 2.5 mm, apex truncate, smooth.
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Ecology

Habitat

Dry hills, stony riverbanks, valleys; 200-2700 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Dracocephalum moldavica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Dracocephalum moldavica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 13
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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Wikipedia

Dracocephalum moldavica

Dracocephalum moldavica (Moldavian dragonhead[1]) is a perennial herbaceous plant. The first formal botanical description of D. moldavica was by Linnaeus in Species Plantarum 2:595. 1753.[1]

Distribution[edit source | edit]

Although there is no precise accounting of its native range, Dracocephalum moldavica is known to be native to the temperate climate of Asia; in China (Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Jilin, Liaoning, Inner Mongolia, Shaanxi, Xinjiang and Shanxi provinces); Russia (Primorsky Krai; eastern and western Siberia); Tajikistan; and Turkmenistan.[1] It has become naturalized in many locales in Eurasia, and is also cultivated elsewhere as a garden ornamental.[1]

Dracocephalum moldavica is an introduced plant to diverse parts of the United States, and is now present in Connecticut, Nebraska, Vermont, and Wisconsin.[2]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e GRIN (May 29, 2007). "Dracocephalum moldavica information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Profile for Dracocephalum moldavica (Moldavian dragonhead)". PLANTS Database. USDA, NRCS. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
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Notes

Comments

Source of an essential oil, sometimes cultivated.
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