Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Robust annual or short-lived perennial herb, often 1-3 m tall, growing from a small slender taproot. Stem usually single, branching below the inflorescence, with a tuft of white to yellowish hairs at the leafnodes. Leaves opposite, petiolate, ovate, 3-20 cm long, covered in short hairs and sessile glands, more densely so below; margin crenate-dentate. Flowers in 2-5(7) subspherical inflorescences per branch, separated by prolonged internodes. Corolla 19-38 mm long covered in orange hairs with 3 fringes of hairs inside at the base of the tube. See L. ocymifolia for comparison.
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Brief

Flowering class: Dicot Habit: Shrub Distribution notes: Exotic
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Distribution

Worldwide distribution

Pantropical. Outside Africa mostly as a weed.
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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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"
Global Distribution

Native of Tropical Africa; naturalised in many parts of tropics

Indian distribution

State - Kerala, District/s: Palakkad, Kasaragode, Idukki, Malappuram, Thrissur

"
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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Shrubs, pilose. Leaves to 11 x 8 cm, ovate, apex acute, base truncate, deeply crenate, minutely punctuate, pubescent, basally tri-nerved; petiole to 9 cm. Thyrsus axillary and terminal, 5 cm across; flowers red; bracts 1.5 cm, linear, spinescent, pubescent; calyx oblique, tube 1.3 cm long, 7-toothed, spinescent; corolla tube 1 cm long, lower lip 1.5 cm, concave, densely villous; filaments 3 and 4 mm, flattened; ovary 1 mm, style 2 cm."
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Ecology

Habitat

General Habitat

Deciduous forests
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Population Biology

Frequency

frequent
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering and fruiting: November-March
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Chemistry

Ethanolic extract of the plant showed antitumor and possibly antimicrobial activity.

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Barcode data: Leonotis nepetifolia

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Leonotis nepetifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Whole plant: Boiled with Hyptis pectinata, Mikania micrantha and Momordica charantia as a wash for piles. Decoction is employed to clean out the uterus; diuretic; tonic to strengthen the back. In a decoction with Heliotropium indicum for bed-wetting. Infusion for diarrhoea and heavy cramps. Leaf and Flower: Cholagogue; infusion as an antidysenteric; decocted with salt or sugar in a preparation to dissolve renal calculi. Leaf: Juice for thrush. In a plaster for wounds. Cooked in an infusion which is drunk to treat itches and skin diseases; for yaws.

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Wikipedia

Leonotis nepetifolia

Leonotis nepetifolia, also known as klip dagga or lion's ear, is a species of plant in the genus Leonotis and the family Lamiaceae (mint). It is native to tropical Africa and southern India. It can also be found growing abundantly in much of Latin America and the West Indies.[1] It grows to a height of 3 metres and has whorls of striking lipped flowers, that are most commonly orange, but can vary to red, white, and purple. It has very soft serrated leaves that can grow up to 4 inches wide.

Varieties
  1. Leonotis nepetifolia var. africana (P.Beauv.) J.K.Morton - Indian Subcontinent, much of Africa
  2. Leonotis nepetifolia var. nepetifolia - much of Africa

Related species[edit]

Leonotis nepetifolia (klip dagga) is related to L. leonurus (wild dagga or lion's tail.) The most noticeable difference between the two is the leaf shape. L. nepetifolia leaves are cordate with serrated edges, except the top pair which are lanceolate with serrated edges, as pictured in taxonomy box. The leaves are all lanceolate with serrated edges on L. leonurus.

Traditional medicine[edit]

Leonotis nepetifolia is known in Trinidad as shandilay and the leaves are brewed as a tea for fever, coughs, womb prolapse and malaria.[2]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  2. ^ Mendes, John. 1986. Cote ce Cote la: Trinidad & Tobago Dictionary, Arima, Trinidad, p. 135.
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Notes

Common Names

FG Creole: gros pompon, pompon. Guyana: lionbush, man-piaba. Surinam Creole: bradibita, bradi bita, bradi-bita, ponsoe.

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In Rwanda, leaves of this plant are used to treat pneumonia, anthrax and syphilis.

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