Overview

Brief Summary

this seems to be a synonym for Salvia misella

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: According to Adams 1972 this plant is frequent in certain areas of Jamaica as well as growing in countries from Mexico to Peru, and in Cuba and Hispaniola.

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Wikipedia

Salvia rypara

Salvia rypara is a herbaceous perennial native to Argentina and Bolivia—due to its being very adaptable it is reported to be naturalized in Mexico and possibly Central America. It prefers stream bank habitats, as the specific epithet rypara implies. It also grows in weedy thickets, thriving at elevations under 3,000 feet. Described by John Isaac Briquet in 1896, it is not very well known in horticulture, with only a few gardeners growing it since the 1990s. It is becoming more well known in the United States, France, England, and Italy because it is easy to grow and makes a very attractive garden plant.[1]

Salvia rypara is a small erect plant that grows to 2 feet tall and wide, with many thin stems. The ovate medium-green leaves cover the plant, and grow up to 2-3 inches long and 1.5-2.5 inches wide. The 6-8 inch inflorescences are long and slender, with spaced whorls of 2-12 flowers each, many of them coming into bloom at once. The flowers are a pale lavender, with a flaring lower lip that is just over .5 inch long, and a short erect upper lip.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Clebsch, Betsy; Barner, Carol D. (2003). The New Book of Salvias. Timber Press. p. 255. ISBN 978-0-88192-560-9. 
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