Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Wide range in central states: Texas; Oklahoma; Kansas; Nebraska; Missouri; Nevada; Minnesota; Illinois. Also found in the southeastern states: North and South Carolina; Georgia; Alabama; Mississippi; Tennessee; Kentucky; Florida.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Rocky or sandy prairies, especially uplands, roadsides and pastures.

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Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Wild Blue Sage in Illinois

Salvia azurea (Wild Blue Sage)
(Insects suck nectar primarily; butterflies & skippers are non-pollinating; observations are from Hilty)

Bees (long-tongued)
Anthophoridae (Xylocopini): Xylocopa virginica sn (H); Apidae (Bombini): Bombus sp. sn fq (H)

Butterflies
Nymphalidae: Danaus plexippus sn np (H)

Skippers
Hesperiidae: Epargyreus clarus sn np (H), Polites peckius sn np (H)

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

Comments: Reported from numerous counties in at least 15 states in the east and central U.S.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Salvia azurea

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Widespread in central and southeastern states in several habitats. Rank provided by NCHP during data exchange Apr/1994.

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Threats

Comments: Nutritious and palatable to all livestock.

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Wikipedia

Salvia azurea

Salvia azurea (Prairie sage or Blue sage) is a herbaceous perennial in the genus Salvia that is native to Central and Eastern North America.[1][2]

Description[edit]

Seeds

Its thin, upright stems can grow to 6 feet (1.5m) tall, with narrow, pointed, smooth-edged to serrated, furry to smooth green leaves, connected to their stems by petioles to .4 inches long (1 cm). There are no basal leaves.[3]

The blue flowers (rarely white), nearly 1/4 to 1/2 inch (7-12mm) long, appear summer to autumn near the ends of their branched or unbranched spikes; their calyxes are tubular or bell-shaped and furry. Two varieties are Salvia azurea var. azurea (azure sage) and Salvia azurea var. grandiflora (pitcher sage).[1][2] It is found on the wild on roadsides, glades, fields and pastures.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kathleen N. Brenzel, Editor, Sunset Western Garden Book (Menlo Park, CA: Sunset Publishing Corporation, 2001; ISBN 0-376-03875-6)
  2. ^ a b Mark Griffiths, Index of Garden Plants, 2nd American Edition. (Portland, Oregon: Timber Press, 1995; ISBN 0-88192-246-3)
  3. ^ a b Carl G. Hunter, Wild Flowers of Arkansas. 6th edition, p. 192. (Little Rock, Arkansas: The Ozark Society Foundation, 2001; ISBN 0-912456-16-7)
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: A species in a genus of about 700 species distributed throughout the world. There are two questionable varieties: S. azurea var. azurea and S. azurea var. grandiflora, with respectively east and west distribution.

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