Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

The name 'Mountain Mint' is something of a misnomer, because this plant and the majority of other members in this genus do not usually occur in mountainous habitats. Common Mountain Mint is similar in appearance to Pycnanthemum tenuifolium (Slender Mountain Mint). It can be distinguished from the latter species by the white hairs along the ridges of its stems, and the occurrence of leaves greater than ¼" across. Another difference is the presence of a strong mint fragrance in the crushed leaves of Common Mountain Mint, while the leaves of Slender Mountain Mint usually have a milder scent. Return
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This is a native perennial plant up to 3' tall and branching frequently, often with a bushy appearance. The green or reddish stems are strongly four-angled and have scattered white hairs along the ridges. The opposite leaves are up to 2½" long and narrowly lanceolate or linear. They are sessile, and have smooth margins. The largest leaves are ¼ - ½" across. When damaged, the foliage releases a strong mint scent. Numerous flattened heads of small white flowers (often with purple dots) occur at the ends of the upper stems. Each head is up to ¾" across and can contain up to 50 flowers. However, only a few of these are in bloom at the same time, beginning with the outer circle of flowers and ending towards the center. Each tubular flower is about 1/8" long and 2-lipped. The blooming period occurs during the middle of summer and lasts about a month. Each small flower produces 4 tiny, finely pitted, dull black seeds. These seeds are distributed to some extent by the wind. The root system produces rhizomes, which spread a short distance from the mother plant. Soon, a small colony of plants are formed vegetatively.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Common Mountain Mint is widely distributed in Illinois, but is uncommon or absent from southern Illinois and a few western counties (see Distribution Map). It is occasional to locally common in moist to mesic black soil prairies. Other habitats include moist sand prairies, moist meadows in woodland areas, thickets, fens, swamps, and rocky bluffs. This is probably the most common Mountain Mint in Illinois.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Pycnanthemum virginianum (L.) B.L. Rob. & Fernald:
Canada (North America)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Common Mountain Mint is widely distributed in Illinois, but is uncommon or absent from southern Illinois and a few western counties (see Distribution Map). It is occasional to locally common in moist to mesic black soil prairies. Other habitats include moist sand prairies, moist meadows in woodland areas, thickets, fens, swamps, and rocky bluffs. This is probably the most common Mountain Mint in Illinois.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Common Mountain Mint in Illinois

Pycnanthemum virginianum (Common Mountain Mint)
(Except for predatory or parasitic insects that lurk on the flowers, insect visitors suck nectar; some observations are from Reed, Moure & Hurd, Mitchell, or Grundel & Pavlovic as indicated below, otherwise they are from Robertson)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn fq; Apidae (Bombini): Bombus affinis (Re), Bombus auricomus (Re), Bombus bimaculatus (Re), Bombus fraternus sn, Bombus griseocallis sn (Rb, Re), Bombus impatiens (Re), Bombus ternarius (Re), Bombus vagans (Re), Psithyrus ashtoni sn (Re), Psithyrus citrinus sn (Re); Anthophoridae (Ceratinini): Ceratina sp. (Re); Anthophoridae (Epeolini): Epeolus bifasciatus sn, Triepeolus lunatus concolor sn fq; Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Florilegus condigna sn, Melissodes comptoides sn, Svastra atripes atripes sn; Megachilidae (Coelioxini): Coelioxys modesta sn (Re), Coelioxys octodentata sn; Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile gemula (Re), Megachile mendica (Re), Megachile relativa (Re); Megachilidae (Trypetini): Heriades carinatum (Re), Heriades leavitti sn

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon sericea sn fq (Rb, Re), Augochloropsis metallica metallica sn (Rb, Re), Halictus confusus sn fq (Rb, Re), Halictus ligatus sn, Halictus parallelus sn, Halictus rubicunda sn (Rb, Re), Lasioglossum spp. (Re), Lasioglossum cinctipes sn (Rb, Re), Lasioglossum heterognathus (Re), Lasioglossum imitatus sn fq (Rb, Re), Lasioglossum pectoralis sn, Lasioglossum pictus (Re), Lasioglossum pilosus (Re), Lasioglossum rohweri (Re), Lasioglossum truncatus (Re), Lasioglossum versatus (MH), Lasioglossum vierecki (Re); Halictidae (Nomiinae): Nomia nortoni nortoni sn; Halictidae (Sphecodini): Sphecodes spp. sn (Re), Sphecodes confertus sn, Sphecodes dichroa sn fq; Colletidae (Hylaeinae): Hylaeus affinis (Re), Hylaeus modestus (Re), Hylaeus verticalis (Re); Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena hirticincta (Re), Andrena quintilis (Mch); Andrenidae (Panurginae): Calliopsis andreniformis sn

Wasps
Sphecidae (Bembicinae): Bembix belfragei (Re), Bicyrtes quadrifasciata (Rb, Re), Glenostictia pictifrons, Stizus brevipennis; Sphecidae (Crabroninae): Anacrabro ocellatus (Re), Ectemnius continuus (Re), Oxybelus emarginatus; Sphecidae (Larrinae): Tachytes aurulenta, Tachytes crassus (Re), Tachytes distinctus, Tachytes pennsylvanicus (Re); Sphecidae (Philanthinae): Cerceris clypeata (Re), Cerceris deserta (Re), Cerceris fumipennis, Eucerceris zonata fq, Philanthus bilunatus (Re), Philanthus gibbosus (Re), Philanthus politus (Re), Philanthus ventilabris (Re); Sphecidae (Sphecinae): Ammophila urnaria (Re), Eremnophila aureonotata (Rb, Re), Podalonia mickeli (Re), Sphex ichneumonea (Re), Sphex pensylvanica (Re); Vespidae: Dolichovespula arenaria (Re), Polistes dorsalis, Polistes fuscata (Re); Vespidae (Eumeninae): Ancistrocerus antilope (Re), Ancistrocerus catskill (Re), Eumenes crucifera (Re), Eumenes fraterna (Rb, Re), Euodynerus annulatus, Euodynerus foraminatus fq (Rb, Re), Parancistrocerus vagus (Re), Zethus spinipes; Sapygidae: Sapyga interrupta; Tiphiidae: Myzinum maculata (Re), Myzinum quinquecincta (Rb, Re), Paratiphia texana (Re); Scoliidae: Campsomeris plumipes (Re), Scolia bicincta (Rb, Re); Pompilidae: Anoplius illinoensis (Re), Anoplius marginatus (Re); Chrysididae: Ceratochrysis kansensis (Re)

Flies
Syrphidae: Allograpta obliqua (Re), Eristalis stipator (Re), Eristalis tenax, Sphaerophoria contiqua (Rb, Re), Syritta pipiens (Rb, Re), Syrphus sp. (Re), Toxomerus marginatus (Re); Bombyliidae: Chrysanthrax sp. (Re), Exoprosopa caliptera (Re), Exoprosopa fasciata, Exoprosopa fascipennis fq, Systoechus sp. (Re), Systropus macer, Villa sp. (Re); Conopidae: Physoconops brachyrhynchus (Re), Physoconops obscuripennis (Re), Thecophora occidensis, Zodion fulvifrons; Tachinidae: Archytas sp. (Re), Archytas analis fq, Gymnoclytia sp. (Re), Gymnoclytia occidua, Phasia aeneoventris, Spallanzania hesperidarum fq, Trichopoda pennipes; Calliphoridae: Cochliomyia macellaria

Butterflies
Nymphalidae: Phyciodes tharos fq; Pieridae: Pontia protodice; Lycaenidae: Callophrys gryneus (Re), Lycaeides melissa samuelis (GP), Satyrium edwardsii (Re)

Skippers
Hesperiidae: Euphyes vestris (Re)

Beetles
Cantharidae: Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus (Re); Chrysomelidae: Luperaltica nigripalpis (Re); Rhipiphoridae: Macrosiagon limbata lgf

Plant Bugs
Lygaeidae: Lygaeus turcicus

Neuroptera
Mantispidae: Climaciella brunnea prd

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Faunal Associations

Many insects are strongly attracted to the flowers, including various bees, wasps, flies, small butterflies, and beetles. Typical visitors from these groups include honeybees, Cuckoo bees, Halictid bees, Sphecid wasps, Eumenine wasps, bee flies, Tachinid flies, Wedge-shaped beetles, and Pearl Cresecent butterflies. Most of these insects seek nectar. Mammalian herbivores and many leaf-chewing insects apparently find the mint fragrance of the leaves and stems repugnant, and rarely bother this plant.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pycnanthemum virginianum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full or partial sun, and moist to average conditions. The soil can contain loam, sand, clay, or gravel – this plant is not fussy about soil texture. During drought, the lower leaves will turn yellow and fall off. This plant is easy to grow, and less subject to foliar disease than some other mints, such as Monarda spp. However, stressed out plants sometimes succumb to rust.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Pycnanthemum virginianum

Pycnanthemum virginianum (Virginia mountain mint) is a plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is a herbaceous plant with narrow, opposite, simple leaves, on wiry, green stems. The flowers are white with purplish spotting, borne in summer. Like most plants in the genus, the foliage has a strong mint fragrance when crushed or disturbed. It is native to the eastern United States.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=PYVI


Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!