Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (2) (learn more)

Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Woody climber or scrambler. Leaves 3-foliolate; leaflets ovate to near-circular. Flowers white, sometimes tinged with pink, sweetly scented. Fruit a glossy brown to black berry, sometimes 2-lobed.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Derivation of specific name

fluminense: of rivers
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution: Along roads, in pastures, or in disturbed areas. Species native to Africa but described from material collected in Brazil. Naturalized on Vieques, St. Croix, St. John, and St. Thomas. Cultivated as an ornamental and naturalized throughout the tropics.

Public Forests: Cambalache, Ceiba, and Guánica.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range Description

Jasminum azoricum is, despite its name, endemic to Madeira, Portugal. There are only two subpopulations, one in Funchal and the other in Ribeira Brava.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution in Egypt

Gebel Elba.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Cultnat, BA

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Worldwide distribution

Throughout Africa and extending to Arabia and the Seychelles; introduced to South America
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution: Canary Islands.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrub scandent, glabrous-glabrate. Leaves opposite, trifoliolate; leaflets ovate, acuminate, often folded along midrib, glabrous, shining, terminal up to 6 cm long and 3 cm broad, lateral usually smaller, subsessile or petiolulate. Flowers fragrant, in many-flowered terminal cymes or panicles; pedicels up to 10 mm long. Bracts linear, up to 3 mm long. Calyx glabrous, teeth 4-5, triangular, c. 1 mm long. Corolla white, tube 15-20 mm long, lobes 10-15 mm long, 5 mm broad, oblong-lanceolate, acute. Stigma undivided; style protruding.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Height: 1-3 m.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It forms part of the Mayteno umbellatae-Oleion maderensis ("Zambujal") (Commission of the European Communities 2009, Fernandes et al. in: Martín et al. 2008).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Frequency

Common
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Perennail

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Jasminum fluminense

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Jasminum fluminense

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 10
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Jasminum azoricum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
CR
Critically Endangered

Red List Criteria
D

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2011

Assessor/s
Fernandes, F.

Reviewer/s
Carvalho, J.A. & Bilz, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
Jasminum azoricum is endemic to Madeira where it is found at two localities. The number of mature individuals has been reported to be between six and less than 50, the populations are stable. However, the habitat of the species is declining due to invasive species, agricultural, urban and infrastructure development, fires, droughts and landslides. This rare plant is therefore considered as Critically Endangered.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
The number of mature individuals has been reported to be less than 50 by Fernandes et al. (in: Martín et al. 2008) and specified as only six individuals by the Commission of the European Communities (2009). The populations are stable.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
Habitat degradation due to invasive species which cause competition for Jasminum azoricum is one of the major threats. Agricultural, urban and infrastructure development are leading to further habitat loss and degradation. Fires, droughts and landslides can furthermore affect this plant (Fernandes et al. in: Martín et al. 2008).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Jasminum azoricum is listed on Annex II of the Habitats Directive and under Appendix I of the Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats (Bern Convention).
The following conservation measures are recommended for this rare species (Fernandes et al. in: Martín et al. 2008):
  • Raising public awareness
  • Management and restoration of its habitat
  • Establishment of protected areas
  • Reinforcement of the subpopulations and reintroductions
  • Control of invasive species and other threats
Furthermore, research on the ecology and biology of the species, population dynamics, habitat trends, and appropriate conservation measures are needed.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Jasminum azoricum

Jasminum azoricum, commonly known as lemon-scented jasmine, is an evergreen twining vine native to the Portuguese island Madeira.[2][3][4] The compound leaves consist of 3 bright green leaflets.[2] The fragrant white star-shaped flowers appear in panicles from the leaf axils in summer, evolving from deep pink buds.[2][5]

The species is critically endangered in its native Madeira. Reports of remaining populations vary between 6 and 50 individual plants in two separate areas, Funchal and Ribeira Brava.[1]

Jasminum azoricum has long been in cultivation in Europe as a greenhouse plant with records in Netherlands since 1693 and England from about 1724.[5] It has been prized for its bright evergreen foliage, long flowering period and scented blooms.[5] Plants are readily propagated from cuttings and by layering.[5] The species prefers a sunny, frost-free position with support from structures such as fences or posts.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fernandes, F. (2012). "Jasminum azoricum". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 8 January 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d R. G. Turner, Jr.; Ernie Wasson, ed. (1999). Botanica: The Illustrated A-Z of Over 10,000 garden plants (3 ed.). Barnes and Noble inc. p. 488. ISBN 0760716420. 
  3. ^ "Taxon: Jasminum azoricum L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville Area. Retrieved 8 January 2013. 
  4. ^ "'Jasminum azoricum L.". The Plant List; Version 1. (published on the internet). 2010. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d Sydenham Teast Edwards; John Lindley (1815). The Botanical Register: Consisting of Coloured Figures of Exotic Plants Cultivated in British Gardens with Their History and Mode of Treatment. pp. 92–. Retrieved 8 January 2013. 


Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Cultivated in many places, not common in Pakistan.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!