Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Mexico

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annuals, 5–20+ cm (taproots relatively short and thin). Herbage glabrous or sparsely tomentose (especially distally). Stems usually 1 (relatively thin, delicate). Leaves evenly distrib­uted; sessile; blades oblanceolate to lance-linear, 2–4 × 0.5–1 cm, bases sometimes weakly clasping, margins usually subpinnate to dentate, sometimes subentire (distal leaves bractlike). Heads 4–10+ in open, cymiform arrays. Calyculi 0 or of 1–3+ lance-deltate bractlets. Phyllaries ± 8 or ± 13, 5–6 mm, tips greenish. Ray florets 0 or 1–5; corolla laminae 0.5–1+ mm (barely surpassing phyllaries, heads perhaps technically disciform). Cypselae densely hairy. 2n = 40.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Mexico

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

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Wikipedia

Senecio aphanactis

Senecio aphanactis is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names chaparral ragwort, rayless ragwort, and California groundsel. It is native to California as far north as the San Francisco Bay Area and south into Baja California. It occurs in dry coastal areas, particularly alkali flats. It is an annual herb generally growing 10 to 20 centimeters high from a small taproot. The plant is mostly hairless, but the upper parts, such as the inflorescence, may have woolly hairs. The leaves are linear or lance-shaped, usually with lobed edges, and measure 2 to 4 centimeters long. They sometimes clasp the stem at the bases. The flower head is urn-shaped and covered in phyllaries. The head opens slightly at the top, revealing many yellow disc florets and sometimes one or more tiny yellow ray florets, although these may be absent. The fruit is a long, thin achene coated in ashy gray hairs and tipped with a pappus of long, white bristles.

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