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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Evergreen shrub or small tree, to 7 m. Leaflets 5-13, sharply serrate, sessile. Flowers bright yellow. Capsule 12-20 cm.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Plains, Cultivated, Native of Tropical America"
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© India Biodiversity Portal

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Distribution

Worldwide distribution

Southern Florida to W Indies and S America
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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"Karnataka: Hassan, Mysore, N. Kanara Kerala: All districts Tamil Nadu: All districts"
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Found along the river banks and often planted in the garden as an ornamental. Common. Native of S.America.
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Distribution: A native of tropical S.America. Widely cultivated in the tropics and subtropics.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Physical Description

Morphology

"
Flower

In terminal panicles; golden yellow, fragrant. Flowering from December-February.

Fruit

A linear capsule, compressed, brown when mature; seeds many, 2-winged. Fruiting throughout the year.

Field tips

Young leaves glossy green.

Leaf Arrangement

Opposite

Leaf Type

Imparipinnate

Leaf Shape

Ovate-oblong to lanceolate

Leaf Apex

Acuminate

Leaf Base

Oblique

Leaf Margin

Serrate

"
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Description

Shrub up to 2.5 m tall, glabrous. Leaves opposite, pinnate, with 3-7 leaflets; leaflets elliptic to elliptic-ovate. Flowers in short terminal ± erect panicles, bright yellow, fragrant. Calyx tubular-campanulate, ± 4.5 mm long; lobes triangular, acuminate, ciliolate. Corolla tube 32-33 mm long, abruptly contracted at the base, sparse pubescent within and glandulose towards the base; lobes subequal. Stamens included; filaments of longer stamens 20 mm long, curved, base glandulose; anther cells 2, linear, pubescent; staminodes filiform, 5-6, 5mm long. Disc shallow cupular, 5-lobed, fleshy. Ovary c. 3.5 mm long, elongated, minutely papillose. Style 18-20 mm long; stigma 2-lobed, lobes oval to ovoid, c. 1.5 mm long. Capsule 12-16 x 0.7-0.8 cm. Seeds orbicular-compressed, 5 x 6-6.5 mm (wing 16-18 mm broad).
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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Habit: A small tree, to 5m."
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Diagnostic

Habit: Shrub
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Ecology

Population Biology

Frequency

Rare
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per.: most of the year.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Tecoma stans

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Tecoma stans

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 21
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Ranges from southernmost Arizona and Texas southward through the Antilles and Central America to northern Argentina, from sea level to 2800 meters (above 1500 m almost entirely as var. velutina). Widely cultivated, and sometimes naturalized (e.g., in southern Florida).

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Uses

Cultivated in gardens and temples.

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Wikipedia

Tecoma stans

Tecoma stans is a species of flowering perennial shrub in the trumpet vine family, Bignoniaceae, that is native to the Americas. Common names include yellow trumpetbush,[1] yellow bells,[1] yellow elder,[1] ginger-thomas. Tecoma stans is the official flower of the United States Virgin Islands and the floral emblem of the Bahamas.

Etymology[edit]

The specific name stans means standing and refers to the plant's habit.

Description[edit]

(Tecoma stans) yellow bell flowers at Tenneti Park 02.JPG

Yellow trumpetbush is an attractive plant that is cultivated as an ornamental. It has sharply-toothed, lance-shaped green leaves and bears large, showy, bright golden yellow trumpet-shaped flowers. It is drought-tolerant and grows well in warm climates. The flowers attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.[2] The plant produces pods containing yellow seeds with papery wings. The plant is desirable fodder when it grows in fields grazed by livestock. Yellow Trumpetbush is a ruderal species, readily colonizing disturbed, rocky, sandy, and cleared land and occasionally becoming an invasive weed

The leaves and roots of the plant contain bioactive compounds, especially monoterpenes, which may have medicinal uses; Honey bees are attracted to it, but-unlike most flowering plants-the honey produced from Yellow Trumpetbush's nectar/pollen is poisonous.

Range[edit]

Yellow Trumpetbush can be found throughout much of the neotropical Americas, including the Southwestern United States and Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean, the Bahamas, Central America, and South America as far south as northern Argentina. It has been introduced to several other regions, such as southern Africa, India, the Philippines and Hawaii. It has become a nuisance weed on several Pacific islands, especially in French Polynesia, where it is called piti.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "USDA GRIN Taxonomy". 
  2. ^ For example Sapphire-spangled Emerald (Amazilia lactea) in Brazil (Baza Mendonça & dos Anjos 2005)

References[edit]

  • Baza Mendonça, Luciana & dos Anjos, Luiz (2005): Beija-flores (Aves, Trochilidae) e seus recursos florais em uma área urbana do Sul do Brasil [Hummingbirds (Aves, Trochilidae) and their flowers in an urban area of southern Brazil]. [Portuguese with English abstract] Revista Brasileira de Zoologia 22(1): 51–59. doi:10.1590/S0101-81752005000100007 PDF fulltext
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Notes

Comments

The “Yellow Alder” is commonly cultivated in gardens.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Comprised of three varieties (A.H. Gentry 1992), or perhaps two or none; Kartesz (1999) does not recognize var. angustata or "angustatum", considering it a synonym.

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