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Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Crepis capillaris (L.) Wallr.:
Argentina (South America)
Australia (Oceania)
Canada (North America)
Brazil (South America)
United States (North America)
Chile (South America)
Costa Rica (Mesoamerica)
Ecuador (South America)
South Africa (Africa & Madagascar)
Mexico (Mesoamerica)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annuals or biennials, 10–90 cm (taproots shallow). Stems 1(–6+), erect to ± procumbent, usually simple (usually with single stout leader, sometimes multiple with slender laterals), hispid proxi-mally or throughout. Leaves: basal and cauline; petiolate (petiole bases clasping); blades lanceolate or ob-lanceolate, runcinate or lyrate, 5–30 × 1–4.5 cm, margins pinnately divided to sharply dentate (lobes remote, unequal), apices obtuse or acute, mucronate, faces glabrous or sparsely hispid (hairs yellow; proximal cauline auriculate and clasping). Heads 10–15(–30+), in corymbiform arrays. Calyculi of 8, linear, tomentulose or stipitate-glandular bractlets 2–4 mm. Involucres cylindric to turbinate, 5–8 × 3–6 mm. Phyllaries 8–16, lanceolate, 6–7 mm (margins scarious), apices acute, abaxial faces stipitate-glandular and glandular setose (setae black, usually in 2 rows), adaxial glabrous. Florets 20–60. corollas deep yellow (reddish abaxially), 8–12 mm (hairy). Cypselae brownish yellow, fusiform, 1.5–2.5 mm, apices narrowed (not beaked), ribs 10 (glabrous or scabrous); pappi white (fluffy), 3–4 mm (scarcely surpassing phyllaries). 2n = 6.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Lapsana capillaris Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 812. 1753; Crepis cooperi A. Gray; C. virens Linnaeus
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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / parasite
Albugo tragopogonis var. tragopogonis parasitises live Crepis capillaris

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
sporangium of Bremia lactucae parasitises live Crepis capillaris
Other: unusual host/prey

Foodplant / spot causer
embedded ustilospore of Entyloma crepidis-rubrae causes spots on live leaf (rosette) of Crepis capillaris
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / parasite
Golovinomyces cichoracearum parasitises live Crepis capillaris

Foodplant / parasite
underground tuber of Orobanche minor var. compositarum parasitises root of Crepis capillaris
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Paroxyna producta feeds within capitulum of Crepis capillaris
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / parasite
uredium of Puccinia crepidicola parasitises live stem of Crepis capillaris

Foodplant / spot causer
numerous, mostly epiphyllous pycnidium of Septoria coelomycetous anamorph of Septoria crepidis causes spots on fading leaf of Crepis capillaris
Remarks: Other: uncertain

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Crepis capillaris

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Crepis capillaris

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 11
Specimens with Barcodes: 14
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Smooth Hawksbeard

The smooth hawksbeard, Crepis capillaris, is a species of the Crepis genus, regarded as a native from the southern part of Northern Europe to northern part of central Europe. It can be found throughout the world as an introduced species and sometimes a garden weed. It is a low, annual plant commonly found on roadsides, flowering from July to September.

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Notes

Comments

Crepis capillaris is recognized by its shallow root system, dense rosettes of coarsely dentate or pinnately lobed leaves, erect slender stems, auriculate-based cauline leaves, relatively small heads, phyllaries with double rows of black setae, and fluffy white pappi. It is weedy and can become a serious lawn pest. It is one of only three species of Crepis with 2n = 6; E. B. Babcock (1947) considered it to be advanced in the genus.
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