Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Regional endemic, range larger that P. planifolia.

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Physical Description

Type Information

Isotype for Pinguicula primuliflora C.E. Wood & R.K. Godfrey
Catalog Number: US 2348073
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of original publication
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): R. K. Godfrey
Year Collected: 1956
Locality: Cluster Springs., Walton, Florida, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Wood, C. E. & Godfrey, R. K. 1957. Rhodora. 59: 219.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: In shallow, usually flowing, water of springy areas, boggy banks of small streams, swamps, rarely in shallow ditches.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

Comments: 26 EO's known from MS, may not be much habitat left in FL, and AL. Very rare to extinct in sw GA, S4 FLHP (insp.). Ranked S3S4 in Alabama (1994), and about S3 if not S4 in Florida (1994).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Pinguicula primuliflora

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pinguicula primuliflora

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Regional endemic. Habitat threatened. Many EO's may no longer be extant or may not survive longer if they are now. Considered S3 or S4 rank in Alabama and in Florida.

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Threats

Comments: Highly threatened by land-use conversion and fragmentation, with habitat being destroyed by drainage and housing developments; also threatened by forest management practices (Southern Appalachian Species Viability Project 2002).

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Wikipedia

Pinguicula primuliflora

Pinguicula primuliflora, commonly known as the Primrose Butterwort, is a species of carnivorous plant belonging to the genus Pinguicula. It is native to the southeastern United States. The typical variety forms a white flower in blooming. Like other butterworts, it has sticky adhesive leaves which attract, capture and digest arthropod prey in order to supply the plant with nutrients such as nitrogen not found in the nutrient poor, acidic soil that it grows in. Its name derives from the fact it is usually the first one to flower in the spring.

Contents

Roots[edit]

Like all Pinguicula, the roots are undeveloped, and are mainly used to absorb water and anchor the plant, nutrients are absorbed through carnivory.

Carnivory[edit]

Pinguicula primuliflora, like all members of the family Lentibulariaceae, is carnivorous. Their leaves are covered with tiny hairs which secrete a mucilagenous liquid. This gives the leaves a wet appearance and is believed to attract insects in search of water. As soon as an insect lands on the leaves, it becomes ensnared in the mucilage; as it struggles, it gathers more of the liquid on it. The plant responds by secreting digestive enzymes that dissolve and digest the insides of the prey, creating a nutrient soup which the plant then absorbs. The leaves of P. primuliflora are green.

Flowers[edit]

P. primuliflora has 5-petaled zygomorphic flowers. The plant is self fertile, but must be pollinated to be fertilized.

Cultivation[edit]

P. primuliflora is an ideal beginners first butterwort in cultivation. It is typically easy to grow, and does not require high humidity, nor extremely intense lighting to flower and create sticky, carnivorous leaves. It can be propagated by selfing, or, more effectively, through cross pollination with another plant. P. primuliflora has known to be quite the weed in cultivation, it is not unusual to find many shoots coming out from the plant, which can eventually take over the pot and may need maintenance. P. primuliflora requires the basics of any carnivorous plant; it needs poor, acidic soil, such as 50/50 peat moss and perlite or horticultural sand mix, or pure sphagnum peat moss mix, with no potting soil or fertilizer. P. primuliflora, along with some other butterworts, can be grown in a tray of standing water to increase humidity and maintain soil moisture.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

P. primuliflora is native to the southeastern United States. Specifically, they are commonly found between the southern east of Mississippi, to the north west of Florida. They are in Zone 8 of the USA. They can handle for short periods down to 20F or -9C for brief periods of time during their dormancy, which typically lasts 3-4 months.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Distinct species. Six members of genus in se US.

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