Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Lophocampa caryae

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 25
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Lophocampa caryae

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There is 1 barcode sequence available from BOLD and GenBank.   Below is the sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen.  Other sequences that do not yet meet barcode criteria may also be available.

TTTACCAGG---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ATTTGG---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ATAATTTCTCATATTATTTCTCAAGAAAGAGGTAAAAAA---GAAACATTTGGTTGCTTAGGAATGATTTATGCTATATTAGCTATTGGATTATTAGGATTTATTGTTTGAGCTCATCATATATTTACAGTAGGAATAGATATTGATACTCGAGCATATTTTACATCAGCAACTATAATTATTGCAGTACCTACAGGAATTAAAATTTTTAGTTGATTA---GCTACTTTCCATGGAACT---CAAATTAATTATTCCCCATCAATTTTATGAAGTTTAGGATTTGTATTTTTATTTACTGTAGGAGGTTTAACAGGAGTAATTTTATCTAATTCATCAATTGATATTACTTTACATGATACTTATTATGTTGTAGCTCATTTTCACTATGTT---CTTTCTATAGGAGCTGTATTTGCAATTTTAGGAGGATTTATTCACTGATATCCTTTATTTACTGGCTTATGTATAAATCCTTACTTATTAAAAATTCAATTCTTTGTAATATTTATTGGAGTTAATTTAACTTTTTTTCCTCAACATTTTTTAGGTTTAGCCGGAATACCTCGA---CGATACTCAGATTATCCAGATTCATATATT---TCTTGAAATATTATTTCTTCTTTAGGCTCATATATTTCCTTATTAGCAGTTATATTTATATTAATTATTATTTGAGAGTCAATAATTAATCAACGAATTGTA---TTATTCCCATTAAATTTATCTTCTTCA
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Lophocampa caryae

Lophocampa caryae, the hickory tussock moth or hickory halisidota, is a moth in the family Arctiidae. Like most species in its family, the caterpillars acquire chemical defenses from their host plants.[1] The behaviour and aposematic coloration of the larvae also suggests chemical protection in this stage, although they have not been analyzed for alkaloid or cardenolide content.

Life cycle[edit]

There is one generation per year.[2]

Larva

Larva[edit]

The larva, a caterpillar, is completely covered in long, hairlike setae arranged in spreading tufts. Most are white, but there are black tufts along the middle of the back, and four long black hair pencils, two near the front, and two near the back. These hairs cause itchy rashes in some people.[2] They are microscopically barbed and may cause serious medical complications if they are transferred from the hands to the eyes.[3] There are black spots along the sides, and the head capsule is black.

The later-instar caterpillars are seen between July to September.[2] They feed in groups of about 100 or so in the early instars,[2] skeletonizing leaves. Older larvae are solitary. They grow up to 4.5 centimeters long before pupating.[4]

Pupa[edit]

The cocoon is loose and has setae woven into it. It overwinters in the leaf litter.[2]

Adult[edit]

The adult moth flies in May and June. The forewings are yellowish-brown marked with white splotches, reminiscent of stained glass. The hindwings are mostly white. The body is hairy and pale brown.[5]

The moth primarily feeds on hickory, pecan and walnuts, but will also eat ash, elm, oak, willow, and other plants.[2] It occasionally causes local defoliation of nut trees, but high densities do not last long enough to cause significant damage.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Weller, S. J., N. L. Jacobsen, and W. E. Conner. (1999). The evolution of chemical defenses and mating systems in tiger moths (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae). Biol J Linn Soc 68:557–578.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Wagner, D. L. Caterpillars of Eastern North America. Princeton University Press. 2005.
  3. ^ Common Caterpillars are Dangerous to Touch! Carnegie Museum of Natural History.
  4. ^ Lyon, W. F. Stinging Hair Caterpillars. Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheet.
  5. ^ a b Rose, A. H. and O. H. Lindquist. (1982). Insects of Eastern Hardwood Trees. Canadian Forestry service, Forestry Tech Rep 29. Government of Canada, Ottawa. ISBN 0-660-11205-1.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Following Lafontaine and Schmidt (2010), the traditional Arctiidae have been transferred to the family Erebidae as a subfamily (Arctiinae), with former subfamilies such as Lithosiinae now treated as tribes. The circumscription of Arctiinae remains virtually identical to recent circumscriptions of Arctiidae, but circumscriptions of some taxa within the Arctiinae have changed.

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