Overview

Distribution

endemic to a single nation

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Cycnia inopinatus

Cycnia inopinatus, the Unexpected Cycnia, is a moth of the Arctiidae family. It was described by H. Edwards in 1882. It is found in the United States (Florida, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin)[1] and Mexico.[2] The habitat consists of high quality barrens remnants.

The wingspan is about 27 mm. Adults have been recorded on wing from April to August.

The larvae feed on Asclepias species.[3]

Etymology[edit]

The species name is derived from Latin inopinatus (meaning unexpected, surprising).

Subspecies[edit]

References[edit]


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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Following Lafontaine and Schmidt (2010), the traditional Arctiidae have been transferred to the family Erebidae as a subfamily (Arctiinae), with former subfamilies such as Lithosiinae now treated as tribes. The circumscription of Arctiinae remains virtually identical to recent circumscriptions of Arctiidae, but circumscriptions of some taxa within the Arctiinae have changed.

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