Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

One of our largest and most easily recognizable tiger moths in Alberta.
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Distribution

Newfoundland west to B.C., south to Utah and Colorado.
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Can be found in meadows and clearings in forested areas, up to the mountain treeline.
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Trophic Strategy

Reported to feed on a variety of shrubs, trees, and herbaceous plants, including Taraxacum, Plantago, Populus, Salix and Alnus.
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Associations

Foodplant / open feeder
caterpillar of Arctia caja grazes on live leaf of Urtica
Remarks: season: 5-6,8-10

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
Carcelia gnava is endoparasitoid of Arctia caja

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Carcelia lucorum is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Carcelia tibialis is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Compsilura concinnata is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Exorista fasciata is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Exorista grandis is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Huebneria affinis is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Pales pavida is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Thelaira leucozona is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja
Other: sole host/prey

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Thelaira nigripes is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Animal / parasitoid / endoparasitoid
larva of Thelymorpha marmorata is endoparasitoid of larva of Arctia caja

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Mid July - mid August.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Arctia caja

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 18
Specimens with Barcodes: 58
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Arctia caja

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 17 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

TTCCTGGTATTA------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------GCTGGAGCTATTACTGTGTTACTAACAGATCGAAATTTAGATACAGCATTTTTTGATCCAGCAGGAGGGGGAGATCCTATTCTCTATCAACATTTATTTTGATTTTTTGGACATCCAGAAGTTTATATTTGAATTTTACCAGGATTCGGTATAATTTCTCACATTATTTCTCAAGAAAGAGGAAAAAAA---GAAACTTTTGGTTGTTTAGGAATA
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Conservation

Conservation Status

Uncommon.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Following Lafontaine and Schmidt (2010), the traditional Arctiidae have been transferred to the family Erebidae as a subfamily (Arctiinae), with former subfamilies such as Lithosiinae now treated as tribes. The circumscription of Arctiinae remains virtually identical to recent circumscriptions of Arctiidae, but circumscriptions of some taxa within the Arctiinae have changed.

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