Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 22 specimens in 11 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 9 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 614
  Temperature range (°C): 4.905 - 27.278
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.277 - 28.342
  Salinity (PPS): 33.233 - 35.806
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.098 - 5.639
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.089 - 1.791
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.895 - 20.862

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 614

Temperature range (°C): 4.905 - 27.278

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.277 - 28.342

Salinity (PPS): 33.233 - 35.806

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.098 - 5.639

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.089 - 1.791

Silicate (umol/l): 1.895 - 20.862
 
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Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Head bores through wood: shipworm
 

The head of a shipworm bores circular burrows in wood thanks to raspy, rotating shells.

       
  Worm-like molluscs of the genus Teredo have been known to people for thousands of years because of their habit of wrecking wooden ships and piers. "There are many different types of shipworms, the largest of which is up to 2 metres long. The worm has a head with two shells (they do the damage), and a wormlike body that follows behindThey invade wood while in the tiny larval stageThe shipworm uses the shell on its head to burrow. Their ridged and rough surfaces rub the wood away as the worm first turns its head one way then the other. This cuts away a perfectly circular tube that is just a bit larger than the shell itself. The worm then eats the wood it has cut away, turning the cellulose in the wood into glucose that it uses for energy. The wormlike body follows behind the shell, producing a substance like chalk to line the burrowThe worm gets its oxygen from water. It draws the water in then passes it out again through through two tubes on its tail called siphons. These stick out from the opening of the burrow but can be pulled in and the burrow closed by special small plates called pallets. These seal the tube so tightly that shipworms can survive when the timber is temporarily out of water." (Liverpool Museum 2008)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
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© The Biomimicry Institute

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:44Public Records:0
Specimens with Sequences:0Public Species:0
Specimens with Barcodes:0Public BINs:0
Species:2         
Species With Barcodes:0         
          
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Teredo

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Genomic DNA is available from 1 specimen with morphological vouchers housed at Ocean Genome Legacy
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© Ocean Genome Legacy

Source: Ocean Genome Resource

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Wikipedia

Teredo (genus)

Teredo is a genus of highly modified saltwater clams which bore in wood and live within the tunnels they create. They are commonly known as "shipworms," and are marine bivalve molluscs in the taxonomic family Teredinidae. The type species is Teredo navalis.[1]

Because it is a tunneling genus, Teredo was chosen as the namesake of the Teredo network tunneling protocol. HMS Teredo, a submarine, may also have been named after this genus, which works invisibly, below the surface, and can be very damaging to marine installations made of wood.

Species[edit]

Species within the genus Teredo include:

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Teredora princesae

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Serge Gofas (2004). "Teredo Linnaeus, 1758". World Register of Marine Species. 
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