Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Strong woody climber with main stems up to 13 cm in diameter. Leaves opposite, 3-foliolate; leaflets ovate with a distinct drip-tip, dark glossy green, hairless except for hair-tuft domatia in the axils of the main veins below. Flowers in terminal and axillary heads, white, tinged with pink on the outside, sweetly scented; corolla with 5 or sometimes 6 elliptic lobes. Fruit c. 7 mm long, glossy black, sometimes 2-lobed.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Derivation of specific name

abyssinicum: of Abyssinia (Ethiopia)
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Worldwide distribution

From Ethiopia to KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Jasminum abyssinicum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Jasminum abyssinicum

Jasminium abyssinicum (Forest jasmine) is a species of jasmine, in the family Oleaceae.

Jasminum abyssinicum is a strong to slender woody climber in high-altitude montane forests, climbing into the forest canopy which stems that can be robust up to 13 cm in diameter. The leaves are opposite, trifoliolate; leaflets are broadly ovate with a distinct driptip, dark glossy green above, hairless except for pockets of hairs in the axils of the leaves. The flowers are produced at the ends twigs or in axils of leaves. The flowers are white, tinged with pink on the outside, sweetly scented with a corolla with 5 or sometimes 6 elliptic lobes. The fruits are a single- or bi-lobbed berry 7 mm long, fleshy, glossy black.[1]

Jasminum abyssinicum is native to Africa from Ethiopia to KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.[2] It has been reported from Burundi, Cameroon, Rwanda, Congo-Kinshasa, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Natal and Transvaal.[3]

The Maasai people of Kenya use this plant as a medicinal remedy for wounds.[4] It is also used as a traditional treatment for the parasitic nematode Hemonchus contortus in sheep.[5]

References[edit]

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