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Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

A medium-sized (4.6-6.0 cm wingspan) moth with dark forewings and red and black hindwings. The forewings are a smooth, dark rich chocolate and grey brown with several fine erratic horizontal lines. A narrow patch along the costa at the apex is lighter brown. The hindwings are deep red-orange, almost scarlet, and are crossed by a complete black median line and a wider black terminal band. The basal area is covered with long black hairs, and the fringes are mostly dark. Both the sexes are similar. The antennae are filiform. Ultronia cannot be mistaken for any other Alberta Catocala.
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Distribution

Ultronia occurs throughout much of eastern North America, south to Florida and Texas. It ranges west across the southern parts of Canada to extreme southeast British Columbia. In Alberta, it occurs mainly in dry shrubby woodland edge along the river valleys of the plains, north to Dinosaur Provincial Park.
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Dry woodland edges and tall shrub, especially wild cherry shrublands; urban plantations.
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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

No Alberta data. Elsewhere reported to use members of the Rosacea, including apple (Malus) and wild cherries (Prunus sp.).
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Adults are on the wing in early August in Alberta.
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Life Cycle

The adults are nocturnal and come to light, but are more likely to be taken at sugar baits. Larvae are solitary defoliators. The egg is the overwintering stage. There is one brood per year.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Catocala ultronia

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 9 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNCATTAAGATTATTAATTCGAGCTGAATTAGGTAATCCAGGTTCTTTAATTGGAGATGATCAAATTTATAATACTATTGTAACAGCTCATGCTTTTATTATAATTTTTTTCATAGTTATACCAATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGAAATTGATTAGTACCTTTAATATTAGGAGCTCCTGATATAGCTTTTCCCCGTATAAATAATATAAGTTTCTGACTTCTTCCCCCATCATTAACTTTATTAATTTCGAGAAGAATTGTAGAAAATGGAGCAGGAACTGGATGAACAGTATACCCCCCTCTTTCTTCCAATATTGCTCATAGAGGTAGTTCAGTAGATTTAGCTATTTTTTCATTACATTTAGCTGGAATTTCTTCAATTTTAGGAGCTATTAATTTTATTACCACAATTATTAATATACGATTAAATAACTTAATATTTGATCAAATACCTTTATTTATTTGAGCTGTAGGAATTACAGCTTTCCTTCTTCTCCTTTCTTTACCAGTTTTAGCTGGAGCCATTACTATACTTTTAACCGACCGAAATTTAAATACTTCTTTTTTTGACCCTGCTGGAGGNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Catocala ultronia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 9
Specimens with Barcodes: 45
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

Scarce in Alberta, at the northern edge of its range. No immediate concerns.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Catocala ultronia

The Dark Red Underwing or Ultronia Underwing (Catocala ultronia) is a moth of the Noctuidae family. It is found in most of eastern North America, south to Florida and Texas. It ranges west across the southern parts of Canada to extreme southeast British Columbia.

The wingspan is 46–60 mm. Adults are on wing in August in one generation depending on the location.

Adult

The larvae feed on Fraxinus pennsylvanica, Malus species, Populus grandidenta, Prunus pensylvanica, Prunus serotina, Prunus virginiana, and Tilia americana.

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