Overview

Distribution

Distribution: most oceans. Naked or with small deciduous cycloid scales. Anal fin short and situated posteriorly. Normal caudal fin. Pelvic fin with 1-9 rays, if present. Dorsal fin rays about 220-392, with origin above or before tip of snout. Swim bladder present. Ink sac opens into cloaca.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:13Public Records:2
Specimens with Sequences:10Public Species:1
Specimens with Barcodes:10Public BINs:2
Species:2         
Species With Barcodes:2         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Lophotidae

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Crestfish

Crestfishes are lampriform fishes in the family Lophotidae. They are elongated, ribbon-like fishes, silver in color, found in deep tropical and subtropical waters worldwide. Their scientific name is from Greek lophos meaning "crest" and refer to the crest (part of the dorsal fin) that emerges from the snout and head; this structure gives them their other name of unicorn fishes.

They possess ink sacs that open into their cloacae from which they can produce a cloud of black ink when threatened (as in many cephalopods).

References[edit]

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