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Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

A large (5.9-6.5 cm wingspan) moth with dark blackish forewings and deep red-orange hindwings. The forewings are dark grey with a few patches of pale scales, in particular before and below the reniform and along the subterminal line. There is a diffuse band or patch of paler scales, some of which are brown, inside of the subterminal band. The hindwings are deep red-orange, crossed by a complete black median and a wider black terminal band. The hindwing fringe is white. The antennae are simple, and the sexes are similar. The contrasting pale patch and brown scaling on the outer half of the forewings is diagnostic of briseis.
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Distribution

Across the Boreal forest region from Newfoundland to the Pacific, south to Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. In the west, replaced southward in the mountains by the similar but larger C. groteiana. In Alberta, it is one of the most common and widespread Catocala species. Occurs across the Aspen parkland and Boreal forest region, north almost to Lake Athabasca. It is also found in lower elevations of the mountains, the Cypress Hills and wooded parts of the Grasslands region.
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occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Mature hardwood and mixedwood forest, and in particular aspen forest.
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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

No Alberta data. Elsewhere the larvae have been reported to feed on poplars (Populus) and willows (Salix). There is some evidence to suggest that willow may be a preferred hostplant.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Adults are on the wing from the end of July through late September.
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Life Cycle

Adults are nocturnal and come to light, but they are best collected using sugar baits. They emerge in late summer and early fall and produce the eggs which overwinter. The larvae are solitary defoliators.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Catocala briseis sp. 1

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Catocala briseis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 2 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

AACTTTATACTTTATTTTTGGAATTTGAGCCGGGATAGTAGGAACTTCATTAAGATTATTAATTCGAGCTGAATTAGGTAATCCTGGTTCTTTAATTGGAGATGATCAAATTTATAATACTATTGTTACAGCTCATGCTTTTATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTTATACCAATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGTAATTGATTAGTACCTTTAATATTAGGAGCTCCTGATATAGCTTTCCCCCGTATAAATAATATAAGTTTTTGACTTCTACCCCCTTCATTAACTTTATTAATTTCAAGAAGAATTGTAGAAAATGGAGCAGGAACTGGATGAACAGTTTACCCCCCTCTTTCTTCCAATATTGCTCATAGAGGTAGTTCAGTAGATTTAGCTATTTTTTCTTTACATTTAGCTGGAATCTCTTCAATTTTAGGAGCTATTAATTTTATTACTACAATTATTAATATACGATTAAATAATTTAATATTTGATCAGATACCTTTATTTATTTGAGCTGTTGGAATTACTGCATTTCTTCTTCTTCTTTCTTTACCAGTATTAGCTGGAGCTATTACCATACTTCTAACTGATCGAAATTTAAACACTTCTTTTTTCGATCCTGCGGGAGGAGGAGATCCTATTTTATATCAACATTTATTT
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Catocala briseis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 34
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

A common, widespread insect. No concerns.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Catocala briseis

The Briseis Underwing or Ribbed Underwing (Catocala briseis) is a moth of the Noctuidae family. It is found across the Boreal forest region from Newfoundland to the Pacific, south to Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.

The wingspan is 59–65 mm. Adults are on wing from July to September depending on the location.

The larvae feed on Populus species, including Populus tremuloides and Salix species.

Subspecies[edit]

Catocala briseis minerva, recorded from Utah, is now considered a synonym.

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