Overview

Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Catocala amatrix

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There is 1 barcode sequence available from BOLD and GenBank.   Below is the sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen.  Other sequences that do not yet meet barcode criteria may also be available.

AACTTTATATTTTATTTTTGGAATTTGAGCAGGAATAGTAGGAACTTCACTAAGATTATTAATTCGAGCCGAATTAGGAAATCCTGGATCTTTAATTGGAGATGATCAAATTTATAATACTATTGTTACAGCTCATGCTTTTATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTTATACCAATCATAATTGGAGGATTTGGTAATTGATTAGTACCTTTAATATTAGGAGCTCCTGATATAGCTTTTCCCCGTATAAATAATATAAGTTTTTGACTTCTCCCCCCTTCATTAACTTTATTAATTTCAAGAAGAATTGTAGAAAATGGAGCAGGAACTGGATGAACAGTATATCCCCCTCTTTCTTCTAATATTGCTCATAGAGGTAGTTCAGTAGATTTAGCTATTTTTTCATTACATTTAGCTGGAATTTCTTCAATCTTAGGGGCTATTAATTTTATTACCACAATTATTAATATACGATTAAATAATTTAATATTTGATCAAATACCTTTATTTGTTTGAGCTGTAGGAATTACTGCATTTCTTCTTCTTCTTTCACTACCAGTATTAGCTGGAGCTATTACTATACTTTTAACTGATCGAAATTTAAATACTTCTTTTTTTGATCCTGCTGGAGGAGGAGATCCTATTTTATACCAACATTTATTT
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Catocala amatrix

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 18
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Catocala amatrix

The Sweetheart Underwing (Catocala amatrix) is a moth of the Noctuidae family. The species can be found from Nova Scotia, south through Connecticut to Florida and west through Texas and Oklahoma to Arizona and north to Montana, Minnesota and Ontario.

An exhibition model done by the Denton Brothers of Wellesley, Massachusetts was discovered in a consingment shop in Flagler Beach, Florida on September 12, 2013 by Brittany Durocher, a resident of that city. It was collected by the Denton Brothers in Virginai and named Catocala Amatrix virginurus. picture of the specimen found by Ms. Durocher

attribution to the Denton Brothers
Catocala amatrix 2154069.jpg
lectotype of Catocala nurus, now considered to be a synonym of Catocala amatrix

The wingspan is 75–95 mm. The moths flies from August to October depending on the location.

The larvae feed on Populus deltoides, Populus grandidenta, Populus nigra, Populus tremuloides and Salix nigra.

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