Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Chiefly marine (rarely freshwater). Distribution: Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. Anus and anal fin origin usually posterior to pectoral fin tip. Anal fin rays usually of the same length or shorter than opposing dorsal fin rays. Scales present. One or more opercular spines in some. Supramaxillary present. Vexillum lacking in larvae. Pelvics usually present. About 1.5 m maximum length.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:774
Specimens with Sequences:673
Specimens with Barcodes:641
Species:111
Species With Barcodes:95
Public Records:145
Public Species:35
Public BINs:39
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Cusk-eels

The cusk-eel family (Ophidiidae) is a group of marine bony fishes in the order Ophidiiformes. The scientific name is from the Greek ophis meaning "snake", and refers to their eel-like appearance. However, they can be distinguished from true eels of the order Anguilliformes by their ventral fins, which are developed into a forked barbel-like organ below the mouth in the cusk-eels; in the true eels by contrast they are never well-developed and usually missing entirely.[1]

They are found in temperate and tropical oceans throughout the world. They live close to the sea bottom, ranging from shallow water to depths below 2,000 m (6,600 ft). One species, Abyssobrotula galatheae, was reportedly caught in a trawl net at the bottom of the Puerto Rico trench, which would make it the deepest recorded fish at 8,370 m (27,460 ft).[2] However, since no others have been seen at such depths, it is now thought it was caught at a shallower depth.

The largest species, Lamprogrammus shcherbachevi, grows up to 2 m (6.6 ft) in length, but most species are shorter than 1 m. Unlike their close relatives, the viviparous brotulas of the Bythitidae, they are egg-laying, and the larvae live amongst the plankton, relatively close to the surface.[2]

A few species are fished commercially, most notably the pink cusk-eel, Genypterus blacodes.

Genera[edit]

The cusk-eel family contains about 240 species, grouped into 50 genera:[3]
Subfamily Brotulinae

Subfamily Brotulotaenilinae

Subfamily Neobythitinae

Subfamily Ophidiinae

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2006). "Ophidiidae" in FishBase. February 2006 version.
  2. ^ a b Neilsen, Jørgen G. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 134. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
  3. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2008). "Ophidiidae" in FishBase. December 2008 version.
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