Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:78Public Records:13
Specimens with Sequences:65Public Species:5
Specimens with Barcodes:64Public BINs:6
Species:11         
Species With Barcodes:10         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Anabantidae

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Wikipedia

Climbing gourami

The Anabantidae are a family of perciform fish commonly called the climbing gouramies or climbing perches. As labyrinth fishes, they possess a labyrinth organ, a structure in the fish's head which allows it to breathe atmospheric oxygen. Fish of this family are commonly seen gulping at air at the surface of the water. The air is held in a structure called the suprabranchial chamber, where oxygen diffuses into the bloodstream via the respiratory epithelium covering the labyrinth organ.

Climbing perch (Anabas testudineus) on land

Of the four genera, Anabas is found from South Asia (they are called chemballi (Malayalam: ചെമ്പല്ലി) in Kerala, India), east to China and Southeast Asia. The remaining three genera are all restricted to Africa. They are primarily freshwater fishes and only very rarely are found in brackish water. As egg-layers, they typically guard their eggs and young.

Climbing gouramis are so named due to their ability to "climb" out of water and "walk" short distances. Their method of terrestrial locomotion uses the gill plates as supports, and the fish pushes itself using its fins and tail.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). "Anabantidae" in FishBase. December 2012 version.
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