Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Chiefly marine; rarely brackish. Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans. Body generally compressed, although body shape extremely variable from very deep to fusiform. Most species with only small cycloid scales. Scales along lateral line often modified into spiny scutes. Detached finlets, as many as nine, sometimes found behind dorsal and anal fins. Large juveniles and adults with 2 dorsal fins. Anterior dorsal fin with 3-9 spines; the second having 1 spine and usually 18-37 soft rays. Anal spines usually 3, the first 2 separate from the rest; soft rays usually 15-31. Widely forked caudal fin. Caudal peduncle slender. Pelvic fins lacking in Parona signata. Vertebrae 24-27 (modally 24). One of the most important families of tropical marine fishes; fished commercially and for recreation.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Carangidae is prey of:
Chondrichthyes
Scombridae
Carangidae
Actinopterygii
phytoplankton
Aves
Isopoda
Amphipoda
Pycnogonidae
Tanaidae

Based on studies in:
Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands shelf (Reef)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Opitz S (1996) Trophic interactions in Caribbean coral reefs. ICLARM Tech Rep 43, Manila, Philippines
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Known prey organisms

Carangidae preys on:
Penaeidae
Mugilidae
Actinopterygii
Carangidae
decomposers/microfauna
Decapoda
Stomatopoda
Anomura
Echinoidea
Gastropoda
Bivalvia
Engraulidae
Scaridae
benthic autotrophs
Blenniidae
Cephalopoda
Coris aygula

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida (Estuarine)
Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands shelf (Reef)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • W. M. Kemp, W. H. B. Smith, H. N. McKellar, M. E. Lehman, M. Homer, D. L. Young and H. T. Odum, Energy cost-benefit analysis applied to power plants near Crystal River, Florida. In: Ecosystem Modeling in Theory and Practice: An Introduction with Case His
  • Opitz S (1996) Trophic interactions in Caribbean coral reefs. ICLARM Tech Rep 43, Manila, Philippines
  • Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 16, 2011 at http://animaldiversity.org. http://www.animaldiversity.org
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:4271
Specimens with Sequences:3354
Specimens with Barcodes:3230
Species:150
Species With Barcodes:145
Public Records:1692
Public Species:106
Public BINs:108
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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Carangidae

Carangidae is a family of fish which includes the jacks, pompanos, jack mackerels, runners, and scads.

They are marine fishes found in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans. Most species are fast-swimming predatory fishes that hunt in the waters above reefs and in the open sea; some dig in the sea floor for invertebrates.

The largest fish in the family, the greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili, grows up to 2 m in length; most fish in the family reach a maximum length of 25–100 cm.

The family contains many important commercial and game fish, notably the Pacific jack mackerel, Trachurus symmetricus, and the other jack mackerels in the genus Trachurus.

Many genera have fairly extensive fossil records, particularly Caranx and Seriola, which extend into the early Paleogene (late Thanetian), and are known from whole and incomplete specimens, skeletal fragments, and otoliths. The several extinct genera include Archaeus, Pseudovomer, and Eastmanalepes.

Timeline of genera[edit]

QuaternaryNeogenePaleogeneHolocenePleist.Plio.MioceneOligoceneEocenePaleoceneSelar (genus)ScomberoidesDecapterusAlepesAlectisOligoplitesHypacanthusSeriolaCaranxApolectusQuaternaryNeogenePaleogeneHolocenePleist.Plio.MioceneOligoceneEocenePaleocene

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2013). "Carangidae" in FishBase. February 2013 version.
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