Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Annual or perennial herbs. Stipules 0. Leaves opposite. Inflorescence of terminal dichasial cymes. Flowers usually 5-merous. Sepals free. Petals white, very deeply 2-fid. Stamens 10, or fewer. Styles 3. Capsule opening by 6 valves.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Description of Astronympha

Devescovinids (28-45 µm) with three anterior flagella and a thick recurrent flagellum, cord-like, longer than the body. Cresta slender; nucleus like a transverse open ring; parabasal with a proximal V-shaped part supporting 4 to 7 small branches or parabasalies. Axostyle traversing the nucleus, with a terminal projection. Spirochetes on the anterior and posterior ends. One species, A. nucleoflexa, occurs in several species of Cryptotermes (GrassÚ, 1952a) (described under the name Stellaria in GrassÚ and Hollande, 1950 and as Foaina nucleoflexa in Kirby, 1942b). Type species: Astronympha nucleoflexa (Kirby, 1942).
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biopedia

Source: BioPedia

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 40 specimens in 3 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 28 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 24 - 125
  Temperature range (°C): 21.719 - 24.522
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.146 - 1.643
  Salinity (PPS): 35.555 - 35.652
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.676 - 4.872
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.169 - 0.246
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.448 - 1.584

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 24 - 125

Temperature range (°C): 21.719 - 24.522

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.146 - 1.643

Salinity (PPS): 35.555 - 35.652

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.676 - 4.872

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.169 - 0.246

Silicate (umol/l): 1.448 - 1.584
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Associations

Foodplant / miner
larva of Amauromyza flavifrons mines leaf of Stellaria

Foodplant / gall
Brachycolus stellariae causes gall of leaf of Stellaria

Foodplant / gall
Cecidophyopsis atrichus causes gall of leaf of Stellaria

Animal / pathogen
Rhizoctonia anamorph of Helicobasidium purpureum infects root of Stellaria

Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Hypera arator grazes on flower of Stellaria

Foodplant / gall
larva of Macrolabis stellariae causes gall of leaf of Stellaria

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Subcoccinella vigintiquattuorpunctata grazes on leaf of Stellaria
Other: major host/prey

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:221Public Records:95
Specimens with Sequences:199Public Species:19
Specimens with Barcodes:197Public BINs:0
Species:34         
Species With Barcodes:33         
          
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Stellaria

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Stellaria

Stellaria is a genus of about 90-120 species flowering plants in the family Caryophyllaceae, with a cosmopolitan distribution. Common names include stitchwort and chickweed.

Food use[edit]

Chickweeds are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Angle Shades, Heart and Dart, Riband Wave, Setaceous Hebrew Character and the Coleophora case-bearers C. coenosipennella (feeds exclusively on Stellaria spp), C. lineolea (recorded on S. graminea), C. lithargyrinella (recorded on S. holostea), C. solitariella (feeds exclusively on S. holostea) and C. striatipennella.

Uses[edit]

Some species, including Stellaria media, are used as leaf vegetables, often raw in salads.

Stellaria media is widespread in North America from the Brooks Range in Alaska to all points south within North America. There are several closely related plants referred to as chickweed, but which lack the culinary and medicinal properties of plants in the genus Stellaria. Plants in the genus Cerastium are very similar in appearance to Stellaria and are in the same family (Carophyllaceae). Stellaria media can be easily distinguished from all other members of this family by examining the stems. Stellaria has fine hairs on only one side of the stem in a single band. Other members of the family Carophyllaceae which resemble Stellaria have hairs uniformly covering the entire stem. This is a favored food of finches and many other seed-eating birds.

Selected species[edit]

Lesser stitchwort, Stellaria graminea


References[edit]

Edible and Medicinal Plants of the West, Gregory L. Tilford, ISBN 0-87842-359-1

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Stellaria (gastropod)

Stellaria is a genus of large sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Xenophoridae, the carrier shells.[2]

Contents

Description

Shells medium-sized to large (diameter of base without attachments 65–128 mm; height of shell 48–70 mm), rather depressed to moderately high-spired, widely umbilicate, with wide peripheral flange (30-40% of total diameter at base) which is simple in some species or is digitate or divided into numerous long, hollow, narrow, parallel-sided spines. Ventral side of peripheral flange non-porcellanous. Foreign objects usually small to very small covering less than 30% of dorsal surface.[3]

Species

Species within the genus Stellaria include:[3]

References

  1. ^ Schmidt (1832). In: Möller. Isis (Oken) 1832: 130.
  2. ^ a b WoRMS (2010). Stellaria Möller, 1832. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=206853 on 2010-08-07
  3. ^ a b Kreipl, K. & Alf, A. (1999): Recent Xenophoridae. 148 pp. incl. 28 color plts. ConchBooks, Hackenheim, ISBN 3-925919-26-0.
  4. ^ WoRMS (2010). Stellaria chinensis (Philippi, 1841). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=468047 on 2010-08-07
  5. ^ WoRMS (2010). Stellaria gigantea (Schepman, 1909). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=468048 on 2010-08-07
  6. ^ WoRMS (2010). Stellaria lamberti (Souverbie, 1871). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=468049 on 2010-08-07
  7. ^ WoRMS (2010). Stellaria solaris (Linnaeus, 1764). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=217332 on 2010-08-07
  8. ^ WoRMS (2010). Stellaria testigera (Bronn, 1831). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=468050 on 2010-08-07
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