Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Usually found in very deep waters. Distribution: tropical and subtropical seas. Body elongate; compressed. Exposed maxilla. Usually with isolated finlets after anal and dorsal fins. Pectoral fin inserted low on body. Pelvic fins lacking or very small. Caudal fin present.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:412Public Records:103
Specimens with Sequences:349Public Species:13
Specimens with Barcodes:336Public BINs:15
Species:21         
Species With Barcodes:19         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Gempylidae

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Gempylidae

The Gempylidae are a family of perciform fishes, commonly known as snake mackerels or escolars.

They are elongated fishes with a similar appearance to barracudas, having a long dorsal fin, usually with one or finlets trailing it. The largest species, including the snoek, Thyrsites atun, grow up to 2 m long. Like the barracudas, they are predators, with fang-like teeth.[2]

They are deep-water benthopelagic fishes, and several species are important commercial and game fishes.

Timeline[edit source | edit]

QuaternaryNeogenePaleogeneHolocenePleist.Plio.MioceneOligoceneEocenePaleoceneHemithyrsitesRexeaGempylusEpinnulaQuaternaryNeogenePaleogeneHolocenePleist.Plio.MioceneOligoceneEocenePaleocene

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2013). "Gempylidae" in FishBase. April 2013 version.
  2. ^ Johnson, G.D. & Gill, A.C. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 190. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
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