Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Mainly marine; some species enter freshwater. Distribution: Indo-West Pacific; one species in the Mediterranean. Strongly compressed, slimy body. Scales small. Head naked, bearing bony ridges on upper surface. Gill membranes united with isthmus. Mouth small; very protractile. Pseudobranchiae absent. Dorsal fin with 8 or 9 spines that are somewhat elevated. Three spines on anal fin. Dorsal and anal fin spines with a locking mechanism. A scaly sheath at the base of dorsal and anal fins. All species have esophageal luminous organs. Also noted for their production of mucus (see common name). Common in shallow coastal waters and tidal creeks and easily caught by trawls or beach seines; important artisanal food fish.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:614
Specimens with Sequences:441
Specimens with Barcodes:426
Species:72
Species With Barcodes:71
Public Records:258
Public Species:53
Public BINs:48
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Ponyfish

The ponyfishes, also known as slipmouths or slimys / slimies, are a small family, Leiognathidae, of fishes in the order Perciformes.[3] They inhabit marine and brackish waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. They can be used in the preparation of bagoong.

Ponyfishes are small and laterally compressed in shape, with a bland, silvery colouration. They are distinguished by highly extensible mouths, and the presence of a mechanism for locking the spines in the dorsal and anal fins. They also possess a luminous organ in their throats, which projects light through the animal's underside.[4]

Timeline of genera[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sepkoski, Jack (2002). "A compendium of fossil marine animal genera". Bulletins of American Paleontology 364: p.560. Retrieved 2008-01-08. 
  2. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2013). "Leiognathidae" in FishBase. December 2013 version.
  3. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2006). "Leiognathidae" in FishBase. February 2006 version.
  4. ^ Johnson, G.D. & Gill, A.C. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 186. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
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