Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

A medium-sized (4.5-5.0 cm wingspan) mottled rusty red-brown moth. The forewings are red-brown with darker patches in the median and terminal areas. There is short basal dash, and two blackish patches on the terminal area divided by a pale w-mark. Antemedian and post-median lines pale, the later curving inward near upper margin. The orbicular and reniform spots are indistinct, marked only by a few paler scales. Fringe checkered red and dark brown. Hindwings sooty brown, with a faint dark discal mark and red-brown fringe. Antennae simple; sexes similar. Male genitalia with ampullae strongly developed, and digitus perhaps the largest in genus. Basal hair pencils present on the abdomen. The strong W-mark separating two darker terminal patches separates lignicolora from other red-brown Apamea, i.e. vultuosa, dubitans and scoparia.  
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Distribution

Nova Scotia west to Vancouver Island; south to Arizona and Iowa. In Alberta found mainly throughout the dryer southern grasslands region, north nearly to Edmonton.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Grassy edges and clearings in wooded or shrubby areas.
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Trophic Strategy

No Alberta data; elsewhere reported to feed on quack grass (Agropyron repens) and other grasses.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Adults have been collected in Alberta from late June to early September.
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Life Cycle

Poorly known. Lignicolora is nocturnal and comes to light. The adults are known to hide during the day under loose bark of trees.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Apamea lignicolora

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 8 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNGGAATTTGAGCAGGTATAGTAGGAACCTCTTTAAGATTACTAATTCGAGCTGAATTAGGAAACCCCGGATCTTTAATTGGAGATGACCAAATTTATAATACTATTGTTACAGCTCATGCTTTCATTATAATTTTTTTTATAGTTATACCCATTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGAAATTGATTAGTACCATTAATATTGGGAGCTCCAGATATAGCATTCCCACGAATAAATAATATAAGTTTTTGATTACTCCCTCCCTCCTTAACTTTATTAATTTCAAGAAGAATCGTAGAAAATGGAGCAGGAACAGGATGAACAGTGTACCCCCCACTTTCATCTAATATTGCCCATGGAGGAAGTTCTGTAGATTTAGCTATTTTTTCTCTTCATTTAGCTGGAATTTCTTCTATTTTAGGAGCTATTAACTTCATTACTACAATTATTAATATACGATTAAATAGTTTATCTTTTGACCAAATACCTTTATTTATTTGAGCTGTAGGAATCACTGCATTTTTATTATTATTATCTTTACCTGTTTTAGCAGGAGCCATTACAATATTGTTAACAGATCGAAATTTAAACACATCATTTTTTGACCCTGCAGGAGGGGGAGATCCAATTTTATATCAACATTTATTT
-- end --

Download FASTA File

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Apamea lignicolora

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 32
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

Fairly common and no reasons for concern.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Apamea lignicolora

The Wood-coloured Quaker (Apamea lignicolora) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. It is native to North America, where it is distributed across much of Canada and the United States.[1]

The wingspan is 45 to 50 mm. The moth is reddish brown with darker patches and a W-shaped mark on the forewings. It is fringed with red and brown. The hindwings are more brown in color. The male genitalia has robust ampullae and digitus. The moth flies from May to August depending on the location.[1]

The larva feeds on a various grasses, including couch grass (Agropyron repens).[1]

Subspecies[edit]

Apamea atriclava was formerly considered a subspecies of A. lignicolora.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c A. lignicolora. University of Alberta.
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