Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Distribution: tropical and temperate Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans. Both eyes on left side in most species. Preopercle margin free and distinct. No spines in fins. Dorsal fin origin above or anterior to upper eye. Dorsal and anal fins separate from caudal fin. Branchiostegal membranes united. Anus on blind side. Egg yolk with a single oil globule. Lefteye flounders are found in all tropical and temperate seas, and several species are of commercial importance.
  • MASDEA (1997).
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:554Public Records:133
Specimens with Sequences:454Public Species:27
Specimens with Barcodes:442Public BINs:29
Species:69         
Species With Barcodes:68         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Bothidae

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Bothidae

Lefteye flounders are a family, Bothidae, of flounders. They are called "lefteye flounders" because most species lie on the sea bottom on their right sides, with both eyes on their left sides. A helpful reminder when trying to recall the family name for this fish is that "Bothidae (Both o' dey) eyes are on the same side o' dey head."[1] The family is also distinguished by the presence of spines on the snout and near the eyes.[2]

Lefteye flounders vary considerably in size between the more than 160 species, ranging from 4.5 cm (1.8 in) to 1.5 m (4.9 ft) in length. They include such economically important species as the Japanese halibut.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2006). "Bothidae" in FishBase. February 2006 version.
  2. ^ a b Chapleau, Francois & Amaoka, Kunio (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 224–225. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
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