Overview

Brief Summary

Recent investigations have suggested that the soft tick (Family Argasidae) Carios kelleyi, which is normally a parasite of bats, may sometimes bite humans and transmit Borrelia spirochaetes that could cause tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF). Carios kelleyi is widely distributed in the United States and Canada and has also been reported from Costa Rica. Unlike many species of argasid ticks that have fast-feeding larvae, C. kelleyi larvae are slow feeders, apparently requiring one to several weeks to engorge. (Schwan et al. 2009 and references therein)

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Distribution

Carios kelleyi is widely distributed in the United States and Canada and has also been reported from Costa Rica (Schwan et al. 2009 and references therein).

  • Schwan, T. G., S.J. Raffel , M.E. Schrumpf, J.S. Gill, and J. Piesman. 2009. Characterization of a Novel Relapsing Fever Spirochete in the Midgut, Coxal Fluid, and Salivary Glands of the Bat Tick Carios kelleyi. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases 9(6): 643-647.
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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Unlike many species of argasid ticks that have fast-feeding larvae, C. kelleyi larvae are slow feeders, apparently requiring one to several weeks to engorge (Schwan et al. 2009 and references therein).

  • Schwan, T. G., S.J. Raffel , M.E. Schrumpf, J.S. Gill, and J. Piesman. 2009. Characterization of a Novel Relapsing Fever Spirochete in the Midgut, Coxal Fluid, and Salivary Glands of the Bat Tick Carios kelleyi. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases 9(6): 643-647.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Risks

Recent investigations have suggested that the soft tick (Family Argasidae) Carios kelleyi, which is normally a parasite of bats, may sometimes bite humans and transmit Borrelia spirochaetes that could cause tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF).

(Schwan et al. 2009 and references therein)

  • Schwan, T. G., S.J. Raffel , M.E. Schrumpf, J.S. Gill, and J. Piesman. 2009. Characterization of a Novel Relapsing Fever Spirochete in the Midgut, Coxal Fluid, and Salivary Glands of the Bat Tick Carios kelleyi. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases 9(6): 643-647.
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Wikipedia

Ornithodoros kelleyi

Ornithodoros kelleyi is an argasid tick parasite of bats found widely throughout North America in caves and other natural and man-made features that harbor bats.[2] The species has not been shown to be a major vector of pathogens.[3]

References

  1. ^ Robert Allen Cooley & Glen Milton Kohls (1941). "Three new species of Ornithodoros". Public Health Report 56: 587–594.
  2. ^ Robert Allen Cooley & Glen Milton Kohls (1944). The Argasidae of North America, Central America and Cuba. American Midland Naturalist Monographs. 1. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 113–117. http://www.archive.org/details/argasidaeofnorth01cool.
  3. ^ Will K. Reeves, Daniel G. Streicker, Amanda D. Loftis, and Gregory A. Dasch (2006). "Serologic survey of Eptesicus fuscus from Georgia, U.S.A. for Rickettsia and Borrelia and laboratory transmission of a Rickettsia by bat ticks" (PDF). Journal of Vector Ecology 31 (2): 386–389. doi:10.3376/1081-1710(2006)31[386:SSOEFF]2.0.CO;2. PMID 17249357. http://www.sove.org/Journal%20PDF/December%202006/21%20Reeves%20et%20al%2006-46.pdf.


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